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Should your company have a Wikipedia Page? 8 Pros and Cons 0

Posted on October 07, 2018 by Rob Petersen

wikipedia page

Wikipedia page for a company increases recognition and notability. It adds credibility to any business.

A Wikipedia page is a web page on world’s best known encyclopedia created, edited and updated by volunteers. It contains over 4,500,000 articles in English, but there are many more in 280 languages.

10,000 articles are read each day and 500 million people read it every month. But Wikipedia has no formal editors or formal peer review process. A Wikipedia page is not for every business or organization.

Should your company have a Wikipedia page? Here are 8 Pros and Cons.

PROS

  1. INCREASES CUSTOMER CONSIDERATION:  Because Wikipedia is a third-party, public website, information on your Wikipedia page may be more valuable to a potential customer than some of the information on your website.
  2. RAISES SEARCH ENGINE PRESENCE AND RANK: A Wikipedia page has high authority and usually a top rank for a brand or business name. A link from Wikipedia to your website is a valuable link.
  3. ESTABLISHES OWNERSHIP: If you think someone might create a Wikipedia page about your company that reflect a bias, then don’t let that happen and be the one to create it, first. Although you can’t control what other might say on it, at least it is yours to direct and attempt to keep correct.
  4. CONTROLS INFORMATION: Each edit or update of wiki information is recorded in the wiki software. If wrong information is edited, the software can easily revert the changes to the previous version.
  5. IS TIMELY: Information is updated online so you don’t have to wait for a particular publisher to update the information.
  6. PROVIDES REFERENCES: Wikipedia page contains references for all documents linked to the wiki information. This increases recognition and notability.
  7. IS FREE: There are no cost to create a Wikipedia page and no licensing or subscription costs required for installing institutional wiki.
  8. HAS FLEXIBILITY: The program has no any predetermined structure, it can be used for a variety of applications.

CONS

  1. ANYONE CAN EDITS: Anyone can add and edit Wikipedia entries, so information could be incorrect or deliberately false.
  2. LACK OF CONFIDENTIALITY: It is difficult to access user rights. Confidential information can get to the wrong persons since anybody can edit the information in Wikipedia.
  3. MONITOR FOR ACCURACY: Because of the first couple of cons, you’re going to have to regularly be examining your Wikipedia page for accuracy.
  4. NEGATIVE TESTIMONY: People who had bad experiences may come and talk about the negative sides of your business, and the editing staff is going to take a long, hard look at what’s going on if they see you deleting every bad thing someone else says
  5. MAY NOT GET A UNIQUE COMPANY PAGE: An editor may decide that your content would be better if merged into an article on similar businesses, rather than giving you a unique place on the web. This is a risk especially if you are a small business or start-up.
  6. NOT ALL ACHIEVEMENTS ARE NOTEWORTHY: A Wikipedia page cannot be promotional. If your company has just achieved a million dollars in sales, that’s not especially noteworthy for Wikipedia. If your company is a medical device that has saved a million lives, that’s a more relevant achievement.
  7. CITATIONS MATTER: Generally speaking, topics with multiple independent citations are considered worth having a unique page. Try for a minimum of four. The more you have, the better. The quality of the citations also matters. A small mention in your local newspaper is not a noteworthy citation. Exposure in a major national magazine might be.
  8. PAYMENTS MUST BE DISCLOSED: If you paid someone to create a company Wikipedia page, this has to be disclosed.

Is your company considering a Wikipedia page? Do these Pros and Cons help?

30 astonishing facts about Amazon customer loyalty 0

Posted on September 17, 2018 by Rob Petersen

amazon customer loyalty

The purpose of a business is to create and keep a customer. – Peter Drucker

Based on Peter Drucker’s wisdom, customer loyalty is one of a company’s most important assets. That goes for any company. Even, or especially, Amazon.

How loyal are Amazon’s customers? Here are 30 astonishing facts about Amazon customer loyalty.

  1. 95% of Prime members say they would “definitely” or “probably” renew their memberships.
  2. 94% of Survey Monkey’s audience say they’ve heard of Amazon Prime and 70% have used Amazon Prime.
  3. 95% of Amazon users always or sometimes read full product descriptions before purchasing.
  4. Almost 90% of Amazon customers say they would not consider purchasing a product with less than 3 stars.
  5. 85% of Prime shoppers visit Amazon at least once a week or more, that number drops to 56 percent for non-Prime members going to Amazon at least once a week.
  6. Nearly 80% of Amazon customers say they trust Amazon’s shipping more than packages shipped by a third-party seller to show Amazon customer loyalty.
  7. 75% of people who shop on Amazon use the Amazon search box.
  8. 69% of Whole Foods shoppers are Prime members to show Amazon customer loyalty with this acquistion.
  9. 65% of Amazon shoppers rank price as the most important factor, above faster shipping, free shipping and better product assortment.
  10. 63% of Amazon customers are Prime members to prove Amazon customer loyalty.
  11. 60% of Amazon customers say they wouldn’t consider purchasing items with less than a 4 ½ star rating.
  12. 59% of shoppers across 27 countries bought items on Amazon.com last year.
  13. 54% of people who buy on Amazon always read the full product description.
  14. 51% of Amazon customers come to the site to compare prices.
  15. 46% of Prime members say they buy on Amazon at least once a week.
  16. 44% of Amazon customers say they will always check prices on Amazon before purchasing on another site as a demonstration of their Amazon customer loyalty.
  17. 43% of all online sales come from Amazon.
  18. 43% say they would pay $10 or more for delivery within an hour while 32% would pay $10 or more for same-day shipping.
  19. 33% of Amazon users come to the site ready to buy
  20. 31% of Prime members go to amazon.com daily.
  21. 30% of Prime members said they ordered products weekly on Amazon in 2016, which grew to 46% in 2017.
  22. 24% of Amazon’s North American retail revenues can be attributed to consumers who first tried to buy an item at stores but found their local stores out-of-stock.
  23. 22% of Amazon users are now more likely to purchase their groceries via the giant marketplace, because of the Whole Foods acquisition, and 37% will consider it.
  24. 7.5% of Seattle’s working age population are Amazon employees.
  25. 13% of people who are not Prime member buy from Amazon weekly.
  26. 1.6 million packages are shipped every day from Amazon.
  27. 45,000 robots roam Amazon’s floors.
  28. #8 most reputable firm in U.S. and #18 in the world.
  29. Amazon is more valuable than all brick and mortar retailers combined.
  30. Amazon Prime offer discounts to everyone on government assistance.

Do these facts convince you of Amazon customer loyalty? Does your business need to improve its customer loyalty?

33 facts on employee review sites for employers not to ignore 0

Posted on August 19, 2018 by Rob Petersen

employee review sites

Employee review sites provide employees the opportunity to rate their job and their company across a variety of measures, usually according according to a scale and/or percentage.

For the most part, employee review sites are used by potential job seekers to find objective, unbiased information about working at a particular company. What is its culture, leadership, chances for advancement, work-life balance and contributions the company is making to something significant.

Roughly 20 highly viewed websites are widely searched by potential employees. The top 5 are:

  1. Glassdoor
  2. Great Place to Work
  3. Indeed
  4. Comparably
  5. Careerbliss

If you’re looking for a job, you might want to check them out before applying to a company. The majority of job seekers read at least six reviews before forming an opinion of a company.

If you’re the employer, that’s just one fact about employees reviews sites to be aware. Here are 33 more facts about employee review sites not to ignore.

  1. 90% of job seekers find the employer perspective useful when learning about jobs and companies.
  2. 89% of Glassdoor users are either actively looking for jobs or would consider better opportunities.
  3. 84% of employees would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. And most in $75-100K salary range would only require a 1-10% salary increase to consider such a move.
  4. 84% of companies believe a clearly defined strategy is key to achieving employer branding objectives.
  5. 80% of Millennials look for people and culture fit with employers, followed by career potential.
  6. 79% are likely to use social media in their job search.
  7. 78% of sales professionals said they would accept less money to work at a company selling something compelling.
  8. 76% of job applicants want details on what makes the company an attractive place to work.
  9. 70% of Millennials say they hear about companies through friends and job boards.
  10. 69% of people would not take a job with a company that had a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed.
  11. 69% is the average CEO approval rating on Glassdoor.
  12. 67% of active and passive job seekers say that when they’re evaluating companies and job offers, it is important to them that the company has a diverse workforce.
  13. 66% of healthcare professionals are likely to accept less money to work at a company with a great culture.
  14. 65% of Millennials said that they are more skeptical of claims made by employers now than they were in 2011.
  15. 64% of Millennials would rather make $40K a year at a job they love, than $100K a year at a job they think is boring.
  16. 62% of employees agree perception of a company improves after seeing an employer respond to a review on employee review sites.
  17. 61% of Glassdoor users report that they seek company reviews and ratings on employee review sites before making a decision to apply for a job.
  18. 60% of Millennials consider the most attractive perk to be growth opportunities.
  19. 57% of Glassdoor visitors are employed either full-time or part-time.
  20. 57% of people think their company should be doing more to increase diversity among its workforce.
  21. 54% read company reviews on employee review sites from their mobile devices.
  22. 51% of employees are considering a new job.
  23. 49% of employees would recommend their employer to a friend.
  24. 48% of female software engineers are likely to apply to a company a friend recommended.
  25. 46% of Glassdoor members are reading reviews when they have just started their job search and have not yet spoken with a company recruiting or hiring manager.
  26. 46% of Millennials left their last job due to lack of career growth.
  27. 45% of job seekers say they use their mobile device specifically to search for jobs at least once a day.
  28. 39% of employees have shared praise or positive comments online about their employer on employee review sites.
  29. Only 33% of employers encourage employees to use social media to share news and information about their work or employer.
  30. Only 26% of employees agree “my employer listens and responds well to me.”
  31. Only 17% of employees highly rate communications from their company’s top leader and senior leadership.
  32. On average, each corporate job opening attracts 250 resumes. Of these candidates, four to six will be called for an interview and only one will be offered the job.
  33. Employees rank as the most trusted influencers when communicating about their company’s engagement and integrity.

Do you think your company should know the influence of employee review site. Does this convince you of the impact reviews have?

12 content marketing case studies from big brands that win big 0

Posted on August 05, 2018 by Rob Petersen

content marketing case studies

Content marketing case studies for big brands show just how effective and accepted content marketing now is.

Did you know Coca-Cola, for example, spends more money on content creation than it does on television advertising?

Content marketing generates 3X more leads than traditional, outbound marketing but costs 62% less. And conversion rates from content marketing are 6X higher than other methods.

Why are more and more big brands investing in content marketing? What are they doing? How is it working?

Here are 12 content marketing case studies from big brands that win big.

  1. ADIDAS: In 2016, the company launched GamePlan A, a digital magazine uniquely developed to build company culture and attract and retain employees. The new strategy is already seeing strong results. Back then, there were around 10,000 employees in the Adidas LinkedIn community – which happens to be GamePlan A’s most important distribution channel. Today, that number has grown to more than 33,000, along with 673,000 general followers.
  2. BEN & JERRY’S: When it comes to companies that lead with their values, Ben & Jerry’s has long been at the forefront. It’s not afraid to take a stance on pressing political issues, including racial justicerefugeesclimate changevoting rights, and LGBT equality. Its content hub reflects the company’s commitment. Amid posts about ice cream recipes and new flavors, there are regular stories that align with Ben & Jerry’s values, like “10 Things Trump Gets Wrong About Refugees,” “QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Climate Change?” and “7 Ways We Know Systemic Racism Is Real.”  Ben & Jerry’s business has tripled in the last 15 years. Unilever, which owns Ben & Jerry’s, reported the ice cream maker grew at double-digit rates for this effort
  3. CLEVELAND CLINIC: Health Essentials, Cleveland Clinic’s consumer-facing site, publishes two to three posts a day and has received more than 45 million visits, to date. Consult QD is a site for a smaller niche of physicians and publishes three to five posts per day. Both sites distribute content via email newsletters and social media channels.
  4. EQUINOX: Furthermore is more than a blog among content marketing case studies. It’s an editorial destination. Run by a team of Condé Nast veterans, the site is an extension of the Equinox brand and features show-stopping photography and design with a range of high-quality writing, videos, and even musical playlists that are published online. The curated and mostly user-generated Furthermore Instagram feed attracts more than 50,000 engaged followers (and several hundred likes per post). With nearly 88,000 subscribers on YouTube, it’s video that’s a clear win for the brand.
  5. GOLDMAN SACHS: With its own in-house studio, Goldman Sachs takes the value of content marketing seriously. Its thought leadership hub, Our Thinking, features various content formats from a podcast (“Exchanges at Goldman Sachs“), to videos (“Talks at GS”), to interactive infographics and articles. Goldman Sachs reaped the benefits of strong evergreen content when one of its older series received more than 1 million views after a mention on Reddit.As for social media, Goldman Sachs is a content marketing case studies powerhouse, sharing lots of video content on Twitter to its 660,000 followers, and racking up more than 23.7 million views on YouTube.
  6. IKEA: IKEA made a foray into the AMSR world with a 25-minute video that showed a woman decorating a dorm room with IKEA products. The video has been viewed more than 1.4 million times on YouTube. IKEA has an energetic community of social media followers, including more than 495,000 who create and follow IKEA inspiration boards on Pinterest, and 1.4 million on Instagram who regularly engage.
  7. KIMKIM: A travel planning service, partnered with local guides that create useful insights and information with the objective of giving their users the best experience. kimkim built their rankings through targeted keywords, they also used digital PR to build their link portfolio, and they created high-quality relevant content on their blog to attract the target audience who often search in Google. They increased organic traffic by 300% – and grew their revenue.
  8. LAND ROVER:  The Land Rover Stories section of their website features travelogues in which photographers document their experiences riding a specific Land Rover model through rugged and picturesque landscapes, like Montana, the Colorado mountains, and Alaska. Each story includes large, stunning visuals. Land Rover’s content strategy also extends to social media and video. Last fall, Land Rover created a video series in which it followed an adventurer couple and their eight-week-old baby taking a two-week trip across Europe in a Land Rover Discovery. Land Rover’s YouTube account has 138,000 subscribers. On Instagram, it promotes its stories and has 3.5 million fans, thousands of whom engage with every post.
  9. LENOVA: To execute its content marketing strategy, Lenovo, one of the largest manufacturers of desktop, computer hardware, developed a digital content hub called Tech Revolution to deliver technical news and technology information to IT decision makers across Asia Pacific region. They were able to successfully engage with their target audience through this content marketing hub. The leads generated via Tech Revolution, were routed to their website, based on which sales executives were able to readily connect with consumers. The digital content hub had more than 250 articles with 34 million impressions, 308 link clicks, and was visited by 1,70,000 new web users.In terms of financials, $300 million in sales was attributable to this initiative alone.
  10. SEPHORA: f you seek a great example among content marketing case studies of user-generated content marketing, look no further than Sephora. Rather than having employees run a beauty blog, Sephora lets customers do the talking. Its content hub is its community of enthusiasts and loyalists, who discuss products and share recommendations, tips, and advice on what’s worth buying.
  11. TRIP ADVISOR: TripAdvisor has used social media and SEO to position itself as the best travel website and the best valuable resource for travelers. But the exceptional thing about TripAdvisor is their user generated content for reviews.Aside from the SEO signal it creates, it also creates more engagements and makes a lot of sense having people with a first-hand travel experience share their reviews.
  12. VISIT SEATTLE: Visit Seattle teamed up with CBS to launch “The Emerald Race.” Past “Amazing Race” contestants embarked on similar challenges in and around Seattle, taking in the city’s sights and outdoor experiences, and meeting notable locals along the way. In October, Visit Seattle launched “Turning Tables,” a series that paired local musicians and chefs to create unique music and dining experiences. The result of these videos: more than 22 million YouTube views. Even more importantly, they’re helping Visit Seattle reach its target demographic of 25- to 44-year-olds.

Do this content marketing case studies convince you of the effectiveness and acceptance of content marketing? Does your brand have a plan for content marketing?

30 fascinating facts on chatbots and customer service 0

Posted on July 09, 2018 by Rob Petersen

Chatbots are robots programmed to respond like humans through a computer program and artificial intelligence.

It is an assistant that communicates through text messages, a virtual companion that integrates into websites, applications or instant messengers to help businesses give better customers service. The video above explains how.

If you’ve interacted with Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa, Microsoft’s Cortana, and Google Assistant, among others, you’ve used a chatbot.

Do they improve customer service for businesses? Are they here to stay?

Here are 30 fascinating facts on chatbots and customer service.

  1. 75% say they want to know whether they are chatting with a chatbot or a human.
  2. 74% of consumers say they used voice search in the past month, and daily use is up 27% compared to last year
  3. 73% of Americans said they wouldn’t use a company’s chatbot after a bad experience.
  4. 69% of consumers say they interact with a virtual assistant or chatbot at least once a month.
  5. 63% of people would consider messaging an online chatbot to communicate with a business or brand.
  6. 61% of consumers believe chatbots are “here to stay” in customer service.
  7. 60% of US online adults already use online messaging, voice, or video chat services
  8. 55% of consumers would like to select their media by curating a list that draws heavily on AI recommendations or simply have it completely selected by a bot
  9. 49% of consumers would rather conduct all their customer service interactions via text, chat, or messaging.
  10. 48% of respondents prefer a chatbot solve their issue over a chatbot have a personality.
  11. 45% of end users prefer chatbots as the main means of communication for customer service inquiries.
  12. 42% of consumers already use digital assistants, while 72% of business execs and 53% of millennials are using them.
  13. 40% of people claim they don’t care who or what is helping them.
  14. 38% of consumers view chatbots positively, 11% have a negative perception of chatbots. The remaining 51% are neutral about chatbots.
  15. 37% of all consumers–and 48 percent of millennials–are open to receiving recommendations or advice from chatbots,
  16. 34% of business executives say that the time freed up from using digital assistants allows them to focus on deep thinking and creating
  17.  only 1/3 of customer service interactions require human support. 45% of end users prefer chatbots as the main means of communication for customer service inquiries.
  18. 31% of business executives say their businesses get the most impact from virtual personal assistants, more than from any other AI-enabled solution.
  19. 29% of people prefer to contact retailers by online apps and messaging chat when making a purchase decision. That’s equal to phone and greater than email at 27%
  20. 27% of the world population is estimate to be using messaging apps and conversing with chatbots by next year.
  21. 27% of consumers weren’t sure if their last customer service interaction was with a human or a chatbot
  22. Global chatbot market is projected to account for $1.23 billion by 2025, with a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 24%.
  23. 23% growth in the number of users of virtual assistants this year.
  24.  The use of chatbots will result in cost savings of more than $8 billion annually by 2022, up from $20 million in 2017.
  25. Approximately 1.4 billion people use messaging apps and are willing to talk to chatbots.
  26. More than 30,000 chatbots on Facebook used in 200 countries by millions of people
  27. Customers prefer it 29 times over the traditional method.
  28. Google predicted that chatbots will have a near human-level lingual ability by 2029.
  29. “Hi” and “hello” are the two most popular ways to start a conversation with a chatbot. Other popular messages included a question mark, “hey,” “help,” “yes,” and a thumbs up icon.
  30. Xiaoice is a ridiculously popular chatbot in China, The average conversation length is 23 conversations per session (CPS). The average CPS for pretty much every other chatbot: 1.5 to 2.5.

Here is an infographic that provides more information why businesses should consider chatbots. Would your business benefit?

chatbots

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