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33 facts on employee review sites for employers not to ignore 0

Posted on August 19, 2018 by Rob Petersen

employee review sites

Employee review sites provide employees the opportunity to rate their job and their company across a variety of measures, usually according according to a scale and/or percentage.

For the most part, employee review sites are used by potential job seekers to find objective, unbiased information about working at a particular company. What is its culture, leadership, chances for advancement, work-life balance and contributions the company is making to something significant.

Roughly 20 highly viewed websites are widely searched by potential employees. The top 5 are:

  1. Glassdoor
  2. Great Place to Work
  3. Indeed
  4. Comparably
  5. Careerbliss

If you’re looking for a job, you might want to check them out before applying to a company. The majority of job seekers read at least six reviews before forming an opinion of a company.

If you’re the employer, that’s just one fact about employees reviews sites to be aware. Here are 33 more facts about employee review sites not to ignore.

  1. 90% of job seekers find the employer perspective useful when learning about jobs and companies.
  2. 89% of Glassdoor users are either actively looking for jobs or would consider better opportunities.
  3. 84% of employees would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. And most in $75-100K salary range would only require a 1-10% salary increase to consider such a move.
  4. 84% of companies believe a clearly defined strategy is key to achieving employer branding objectives.
  5. 80% of Millennials look for people and culture fit with employers, followed by career potential.
  6. 79% are likely to use social media in their job search.
  7. 78% of sales professionals said they would accept less money to work at a company selling something compelling.
  8. 76% of job applicants want details on what makes the company an attractive place to work.
  9. 70% of Millennials say they hear about companies through friends and job boards.
  10. 69% of people would not take a job with a company that had a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed.
  11. 69% is the average CEO approval rating on Glassdoor.
  12. 67% of active and passive job seekers say that when they’re evaluating companies and job offers, it is important to them that the company has a diverse workforce.
  13. 66% of healthcare professionals are likely to accept less money to work at a company with a great culture.
  14. 65% of Millennials said that they are more skeptical of claims made by employers now than they were in 2011.
  15. 64% of Millennials would rather make $40K a year at a job they love, than $100K a year at a job they think is boring.
  16. 62% of employees agree perception of a company improves after seeing an employer respond to a review on employee review sites.
  17. 61% of Glassdoor users report that they seek company reviews and ratings on employee review sites before making a decision to apply for a job.
  18. 60% of Millennials consider the most attractive perk to be growth opportunities.
  19. 57% of Glassdoor visitors are employed either full-time or part-time.
  20. 57% of people think their company should be doing more to increase diversity among its workforce.
  21. 54% read company reviews on employee review sites from their mobile devices.
  22. 51% of employees are considering a new job.
  23. 49% of employees would recommend their employer to a friend.
  24. 48% of female software engineers are likely to apply to a company a friend recommended.
  25. 46% of Glassdoor members are reading reviews when they have just started their job search and have not yet spoken with a company recruiting or hiring manager.
  26. 46% of Millennials left their last job due to lack of career growth.
  27. 45% of job seekers say they use their mobile device specifically to search for jobs at least once a day.
  28. 39% of employees have shared praise or positive comments online about their employer on employee review sites.
  29. Only 33% of employers encourage employees to use social media to share news and information about their work or employer.
  30. Only 26% of employees agree “my employer listens and responds well to me.”
  31. Only 17% of employees highly rate communications from their company’s top leader and senior leadership.
  32. On average, each corporate job opening attracts 250 resumes. Of these candidates, four to six will be called for an interview and only one will be offered the job.
  33. Employees rank as the most trusted influencers when communicating about their company’s engagement and integrity.

Do you think your company should know the influence of employee review site. Does this convince you of the impact reviews have?

6 segmentation case studies open up new revenues for brands 0

Posted on August 13, 2018 by Rob Petersen

segmentation

Segmentation is the process of defining and subdividing a large homogenous market into clearly identifiable segments having similar needs, wants, or demand characteristics.

The importance of segmentation is that it allows a business to precisely reach a consumer with specific needs and wants. This enables the company to use resources more effectively, make better strategic marketing decisions and realize new revenue streams.

Four basic factors are required for effective market segmentation. They are:

  1. Clear identification of the segment
  2. Measurement of its effective size
  3. Accessibility through marketing efforts
  4. Dedication of company resources

Whose done it well? Here are 6 segmentation case studies that opened up new revenues for brands.

  1. BUSTEDTEES: Ecommerce retailer BustedTees has a global customer base. It used to send all of its emails at the same time of day. The company segmented its email list by time zone then set its campaigns to be delivered at 10 am local time. BustedTees added an extra layer of segmentation using past data on individual open times to develop a personalized send time for each subscriber. The results were:
    • 8% lift in email revenue overnight from personalised send time.
    • 17% increase in total email response rate.
    • 11% higher clickthrough rate.
    • 7.6% increase in post-click site engagement.
  2. CANON: The quick rise of Smartphone cameras was eclipsing the development of the digital camera market. The kids segment was an under-developed market. Canon was trying to extend its target segment from parents-to-be to parents with kids, targeting mainly 5-9 years old and their parents. Dubbed Kidictionary, a three months contest asked participants to interoperate an ordinary word in a creative way through photography, and then to share online and social media. In order to drive better engagement, the company planted the seed via key opinion bloggers and online advertising to draw eyeballs. The campaign website pulled in 3,559 (64.3% ) new visitors and 1,976 (35.7%) returning visitors. In total, the site recorded 5,535 visitors per month and over 180 visitors per day. Total submission on the “Kidictionary” reached 344 and 348 users.The campaign gained 40% market share on low-end DC compared to last year.
  3. DOGGYLOOT: Flash sale site Doggyloot segments and personalises its emails based on the type of dog that its customers own, so people with big dogs get different emails to those who own a terrier. In order to collect this information the company offered incentives to its existing email list if they shared their dog’s size and birthday. The campaigns segmented into three groups based on dog size, and yielded results:
    • Open rate up 10.2%.
    • Clickthrough rate is 410% higher than average.
    • Contributes up to 13% of daily total revenue.
  4. JOHNNY CUPCAKES: Clothing retailer Johnny Cupcakes had an email list of 80,000 customers. However, the data was incomplete and everyone received the same marketing messages. In order to make its emails more effective, Johnny Cupcakes initially used vendor software to mine additional information from its customers’ social profiles. It was then able to find out data on gender, customer interests, brand preferences and media habits. For the first time the business could run a product launch campaign with separate emails for men and women who had expressed an interest in baseball. This fairly simple segmentation resulted in:
    • 42% increase in clickthrough rates.
    • 123% increase in conversion rate.
    • 141% increase in revenue per campaign.
  5. LEGO: By carefully targeting its intended audiences and using the social media platforms where these consumers actively participate, the Lego Group was able to effectively reach its customers and offer them the kind of online experience. The company used six distinct personas to categorize their customers based on purchase and usage rates: These six personas ranged from consumers who were highly involved with the Lego Group’s products, such as those who helped shape product design to those having no experience with the brand. By actively engaging these people and giving them special attention, the Lego Group stood the best chance of encouraging them to be the company’s most ardent advocates. The Lego Group became the world’s fourth largest toy manufacturer, capturing approximately 6.9% of the global market share of toy sales and continues to sustain a high growth rate, as well as showing a net profit of about $688 million dollars for the year.
  6. ROYAL CANADIAN MINT: By identifying key characteristics of high-value new and existing customers, the Mint wanted to create custom models to develop effective up-sell and cross-sell strategies throughout the consumer lifecycle. By turning to PRIZM and TKTK the Mint was able to score the best unaddressed admail segments as having the highest concentrations of those prospects and top performing segments. These same insights also helped the mint develop messages that would resonate with those consumers. The data analytics helped the Mint add 140,000 new customers in a single campaign. The Mint was able to identify 15 percent more prospects for major coin purchases—and predicted higher revenues over the next year.

To these case studies convince you of the effectiveness of market segmentation? Is your brand ready to realize new revenue streams through segmentation?

12 content marketing case studies from big brands that win big 0

Posted on August 05, 2018 by Rob Petersen

content marketing case studies

Content marketing case studies for big brands show just how effective and accepted content marketing now is.

Did you know Coca-Cola, for example, spends more money on content creation than it does on television advertising?

Content marketing generates 3X more leads than traditional, outbound marketing but costs 62% less. And conversion rates from content marketing are 6X higher than other methods.

Why are more and more big brands investing in content marketing? What are they doing? How is it working?

Here are 12 content marketing case studies from big brands that win big.

  1. ADIDAS: In 2016, the company launched GamePlan A, a digital magazine uniquely developed to build company culture and attract and retain employees. The new strategy is already seeing strong results. Back then, there were around 10,000 employees in the Adidas LinkedIn community – which happens to be GamePlan A’s most important distribution channel. Today, that number has grown to more than 33,000, along with 673,000 general followers.
  2. BEN & JERRY’S: When it comes to companies that lead with their values, Ben & Jerry’s has long been at the forefront. It’s not afraid to take a stance on pressing political issues, including racial justicerefugeesclimate changevoting rights, and LGBT equality. Its content hub reflects the company’s commitment. Amid posts about ice cream recipes and new flavors, there are regular stories that align with Ben & Jerry’s values, like “10 Things Trump Gets Wrong About Refugees,” “QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Climate Change?” and “7 Ways We Know Systemic Racism Is Real.”  Ben & Jerry’s business has tripled in the last 15 years. Unilever, which owns Ben & Jerry’s, reported the ice cream maker grew at double-digit rates for this effort
  3. CLEVELAND CLINIC: Health Essentials, Cleveland Clinic’s consumer-facing site, publishes two to three posts a day and has received more than 45 million visits, to date. Consult QD is a site for a smaller niche of physicians and publishes three to five posts per day. Both sites distribute content via email newsletters and social media channels.
  4. EQUINOX: Furthermore is more than a blog among content marketing case studies. It’s an editorial destination. Run by a team of Condé Nast veterans, the site is an extension of the Equinox brand and features show-stopping photography and design with a range of high-quality writing, videos, and even musical playlists that are published online. The curated and mostly user-generated Furthermore Instagram feed attracts more than 50,000 engaged followers (and several hundred likes per post). With nearly 88,000 subscribers on YouTube, it’s video that’s a clear win for the brand.
  5. GOLDMAN SACHS: With its own in-house studio, Goldman Sachs takes the value of content marketing seriously. Its thought leadership hub, Our Thinking, features various content formats from a podcast (“Exchanges at Goldman Sachs“), to videos (“Talks at GS”), to interactive infographics and articles. Goldman Sachs reaped the benefits of strong evergreen content when one of its older series received more than 1 million views after a mention on Reddit.As for social media, Goldman Sachs is a content marketing case studies powerhouse, sharing lots of video content on Twitter to its 660,000 followers, and racking up more than 23.7 million views on YouTube.
  6. IKEA: IKEA made a foray into the AMSR world with a 25-minute video that showed a woman decorating a dorm room with IKEA products. The video has been viewed more than 1.4 million times on YouTube. IKEA has an energetic community of social media followers, including more than 495,000 who create and follow IKEA inspiration boards on Pinterest, and 1.4 million on Instagram who regularly engage.
  7. KIMKIM: A travel planning service, partnered with local guides that create useful insights and information with the objective of giving their users the best experience. kimkim built their rankings through targeted keywords, they also used digital PR to build their link portfolio, and they created high-quality relevant content on their blog to attract the target audience who often search in Google. They increased organic traffic by 300% – and grew their revenue.
  8. LAND ROVER:  The Land Rover Stories section of their website features travelogues in which photographers document their experiences riding a specific Land Rover model through rugged and picturesque landscapes, like Montana, the Colorado mountains, and Alaska. Each story includes large, stunning visuals. Land Rover’s content strategy also extends to social media and video. Last fall, Land Rover created a video series in which it followed an adventurer couple and their eight-week-old baby taking a two-week trip across Europe in a Land Rover Discovery. Land Rover’s YouTube account has 138,000 subscribers. On Instagram, it promotes its stories and has 3.5 million fans, thousands of whom engage with every post.
  9. LENOVA: To execute its content marketing strategy, Lenovo, one of the largest manufacturers of desktop, computer hardware, developed a digital content hub called Tech Revolution to deliver technical news and technology information to IT decision makers across Asia Pacific region. They were able to successfully engage with their target audience through this content marketing hub. The leads generated via Tech Revolution, were routed to their website, based on which sales executives were able to readily connect with consumers. The digital content hub had more than 250 articles with 34 million impressions, 308 link clicks, and was visited by 1,70,000 new web users.In terms of financials, $300 million in sales was attributable to this initiative alone.
  10. SEPHORA: f you seek a great example among content marketing case studies of user-generated content marketing, look no further than Sephora. Rather than having employees run a beauty blog, Sephora lets customers do the talking. Its content hub is its community of enthusiasts and loyalists, who discuss products and share recommendations, tips, and advice on what’s worth buying.
  11. TRIP ADVISOR: TripAdvisor has used social media and SEO to position itself as the best travel website and the best valuable resource for travelers. But the exceptional thing about TripAdvisor is their user generated content for reviews.Aside from the SEO signal it creates, it also creates more engagements and makes a lot of sense having people with a first-hand travel experience share their reviews.
  12. VISIT SEATTLE: Visit Seattle teamed up with CBS to launch “The Emerald Race.” Past “Amazing Race” contestants embarked on similar challenges in and around Seattle, taking in the city’s sights and outdoor experiences, and meeting notable locals along the way. In October, Visit Seattle launched “Turning Tables,” a series that paired local musicians and chefs to create unique music and dining experiences. The result of these videos: more than 22 million YouTube views. Even more importantly, they’re helping Visit Seattle reach its target demographic of 25- to 44-year-olds.

Do this content marketing case studies convince you of the effectiveness and acceptance of content marketing? Does your brand have a plan for content marketing?

15 content marketing and SEO similarities simply explained 0

Posted on July 29, 2018 by Rob Petersen

Content marketing and SEO

Content marketing and SEO share the common goal of attracting visitors to a website delivering the right message to the right people at the right time.

Content marketing works through the creation and sharing of interesting materials (such as videos, blogs, and social media posts) that not explicitly promote your brand but stimulate interest in its products or services.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) increases the quantity and quality of traffic to your website through using relevant keywords, links, titles and meta descriptions that achieve high rankings in search results.

Content marketing costs 62% less than traditional marketing and generates 3X the number of leads. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) increases the quantity and quality of traffic to your website using relevant keywords, links, titles and meta descriptions that achieve high rankings in search results. 51% of all website traffic comes from organic search.

While one seems more creative and the other seems more technical, they have a lot in common and work best together.

Here are 15 content marketing and SEO similarities simply explained.

  1. KEYWORDS: SEO is about researching and finding relevant keywords that can achieve a high rank on a search engine results page. Content marketing is turning those keywords into compelling communication that creates interest, motivate action and achieves results
  2. CONTENT: SEO demands content in the form of articles, copy, words, and keywords. Since content marketing involves the development of useful and relevant content, it can be defined as the practical application of SEO. Strong content truly reigns supreme in SEO.
  3. LINKS (OUTBOUND LINKS): Links connect your website to another website. And that website to the next website. This expands the relevance of your content and helps search engines connect the dots.
  4. BACKLINKS (INBOUND LINKS): Backlinks, from another site to your site, have been the number one ranking signal for a long time and they’re not going away anytime soon. That’s because they demonstrate your authority. This is something that matters the the search engines and your audience. Getting quality backlinks to your website is essential.
  5. INTERNAL LINKS: Internal links connect one page of your website to another. They should also be used for content marketing and SEO because they help lead the consumer on the consumer journey you want. And they  give the search engine a better idea what your site is about.
  6. EARNED MEDIA: Content marketing and SEO are free, natural, organic way to drive traffic. You can’t buy your way into this position.
  7. DURATION: Unlike paid efforts and ads that provide visibility only as long as you spend money on them, the benefit of content marketing and SEO, when pursued with the right strategy and purpose, don’t go away and continue to reap rewards.
  8. CONSISTENCY: Content marketing and SEO require consistency. Fresh, unique and creative content gets rapidly indexed and ranks higher than low-value and repetitive content.
  9. INDEXING: An important component of SEO planning is to know how many search engine pages your website are found or “indexed” on. Obviously, content creation leads to a greater number of web pages.
  10. COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS: When undertaking content marketing and SEO, competitive analysis should occur at the beginning. By understanding what your competitors do, say, offer and rank, you will do a much better job of developing the strongest keywords for your business, unique content, differentiation and your own voice and brand position.
  11. TITLES: Content marketing and SEO rely on good titles ensures a great user experience so the visitor can recognize the information from the page before they actually click on it.
  12. LENGTHAccording to SEMRUSH, pages that rank the highest in Google’s search engine results pages (or SERPs) tend to also have the highest amount of content. The average content length for these top 3 rankings was around 750 words; only 250 words longer than the content down in 20th position.
  13. PAGE LOADING SPEED: A survey by Kissmetrics revealed 40% of shoppers will abandon a website that takes more than three seconds to load; so, if your website doesn’t load quickly enough, you’re simply driving these potential customers straight to your competitors.
  14. DYNAMISM: Activity and progress attract both people and search engines. They are signals to both that something interesting is going on that deserves notice. By publishing content on a regular basis, you are also helping you SEO and visa-versa.
  15. INTEGRATION: Your SEO campaign won’t have the desired effect unless you integrate a proper content marketing strategy into it. Similarly, your content marketing strategy will not yield the desired results if you don’t incorporate an effective SEO plan.

Do these similarities of content marketing and SEO make sense to you? Are you integrating them into your marketing efforts

42 inspiring quotes explain stages of the path to success 0

Posted on July 16, 2018 by Rob Petersen

path to success

Path to success is often defined as the accomplishment of an aim or purpose or a person or thing that achieves desired aims or attains prosperity.

This is the end result, but it’s not the path to get there.

Here are 42 inspiring quotes on the path to success. While they are meant to be motivational, they are more to explain stages of  the path to success and how to get there which are:

  • Success is found from failure
  • Success is created from within
  • Success comes from listening to yourself, and ignoring others
  • Success is shaped by values
  • Success requires action and perseverance
  • Success builds momentum

See if this journey matches your understanding of the path to success:

The path to success is found from failure

  • “Success is not final; failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts.” – Winston S. Churchill
  • “It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.” – Herman Melville
  • The road to success and the road to failure are almost exactly the same.” – Colin R. Davis
  • “Success is walking from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.” – Winston Churchill
  • “Would you like me to give you a formula for success? It’s quite simple, really: Double your rate of failure. You are thinking of failure as the enemy of success. But it isn’t at all. You can be discouraged by failure or you can learn from it, so go ahead and make mistakes. Make all you can. Because remember that’s where you will find success.” – Thomas J. Watson
  • “The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • “I failed my way to success.” – Thomas Edison

The path to success is created from within

  • “Opportunities don’t happen. You create them.” – Chris Grosser
  • “Don’t be afraid to give up the good to go for the great.” – John D. Rockefeller
  • “If you are not willing to risk the usual, you will have to settle for the ordinary.” – Jim Rohn
  • “All progress takes place outside the comfort zone.” – Michael John Bobak
  • “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.” – Walt Disney
  • “Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.” – Henry David Thoreau
  • If you can dream it, you can do it.” – Walt Disney
  • “There is a powerful driving force inside every human being that, once unleashed, can make any vision, dream, or desire a reality.” – Anthony Robbins

The path to success comes from listening to yourself, and ignoring others

  • “There are two types of people who will tell you that you cannot make a difference in this world: those who are afraid to try and those who are afraid you will succeed.” – Ray Goforth
  • “Successful people do what unsuccessful people are not willing to do. Don’t wish it were easier; wish you were better.” – Jim Rohn
  • “I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice, and then going away and doing the exact opposite.” – G. K. Chesterton
  • “I cannot give you the formula for success, but I can give you the formula for failure–It is: Try to please everybody.” – Herbert Bayard Swope
  • “A successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks that other throw at him.” – David Brinkley
  • Don’t be distracted by criticism. Remember–the only taste of success some people get is to take a bite out of you.” – Zig Ziglar
  • “The secret to success is to know something nobody else knows.” – Aristotle Onassis
The path to success is shaped by values
  • “Try not to become a man of success. Rather become a man of value.”– Albert Einstein
  • “Never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense.” – Winston Churchill
  • “Stop chasing the money and start chasing the passion.” – Tony Hsieh
  • “Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.” – Helen Keller
  • “The successful warrior is the average man, with laser-like focus.” – Bruce Lee

The path to success requires actions and perseverance

  •  There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” – Colin Powell
  • “I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have.” – Thomas Jefferson
  • “Success seems to be connected with action. Successful people keep moving. They make mistakes, but they don’t quit.” – Conrad Hilton
  • If you really want to do something, you’ll find a way. If you don’t, you’ll find an excuse.” – Jim Rohn
  • “If you really look closely, most overnight successes took a long time.” – Steve Jobs
  • “The real test is not whether you avoid this failure, because you won’t. It’s whether you let it harden or shame you into inaction, or whether you learn from it; whether you choose to persevere.” – Barack Obama
  • “Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.” – Thomas Edison
  • “You know you are on the road to success if you would do your job, and not be paid for it.” – Oprah Winfrey
  • “I never dreamed about success, I worked for it.” – Estee Lauder
  • “The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary.” – Vidal Sassoon

The path to success builds upon itself

  • “People who succeed have momentum. The more they succeed, the more they want to succeed, and the more they find a way to succeed. Similarly, when someone is failing, the tendency is to get on a downward spiral that can even become a self-fulfilling prophecy.” – Tony Robbins
  • “Don’t let the fear of losing be greater than the excitement of winning.” – Robert Kiyosaki
  • “Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.” – Albert Schweitzer
  • “The secret of success is to do the common thing uncommonly well.” – John D. Rockefeller Jr.
  • “I never did anything worth doing by accident, nor did any of my inventions come indirectly through accident, except the phonograph. No, when I have fully decided that a result is worth getting, I go about it, and make trial after trial, until it comes.” – Thomas Edison

There are simple, yet effective methods for overcoming fear of failure. Does this sound like the path to success for you?

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