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27 surprising facts about collaboration in the workplace 0

Posted on October 01, 2017 by Rob Petersen

Collaboration

Collaboration is a cooperative arrangement where two or more parties (who may or may not have worked together before) work jointly toward a common goal. When collaborations works, the collective “know how” creates results not possible without the collective interaction.

With this kind of promise, is it working in the workplace?

Here are 27 surprising facts about collaboration in the workplace. They show why it works and why it is or isn’t working in our businesses today.

WHY IT WORKS

  1. Managers are the Number 1 way that people feel supported by their organization. (Forbes)
  2. 90% of employees believe that decision-makers should seek other opinions before making a final decision. (Salesforce)
  3. 88% agree that a culture of knowledge-sharing correlates to high employee morale and job satisfaction. (Oscar Berg)
  4. 88% believe collaboration accelerates decision making. (Next Plane)
  5. 75% of employers rate team work and collaboration as “very important.” (Queens University)
  6. Women are 66% more likely than men to help others in need  – an action that typically costs more time and energy than sharing knowledge and expertise. (Oscar Berg)
  7. 60% of respondents have experienced change in their way of thinking due to collaborations. (Oscar Berg)
  8. 56% pointed out collaboration-related measure as the factor that will have the greatest impact on their organization’s overall profitability. (Oscar Berg)
  9. 56% of respondents said that they were happier when they collaborated. (Oscar Berg)
  10. 53% are confident that collaborations are having a positive and tangible impact on their organization. (Oscar Berg)
  11. Compared to two decades ago, the time managers and employees spend on collaborative activities has ballooned by 50% or more. (Oscar Berg)
  12. Over 50% of employees and managers identify time saved completing tasks as a benefit of collaboration.
  13. 49% of Millennials support social tools for workplace collaboration. (Queens University)
  14. 33% of organizations are using social collaboration tools across all departments. 50% of those surveyed expect that number to increase in 2017. (Next Plane)
  15. 30% want to collaborate more, with women slightly more collaborative than men. (Oscar Berg)
  16. Men are 36% more likely to share knowledge and expertise than women. (Oscar Berg)

WHY IT IS OR ISN’T WORKING

  1. 97% of employees and executives believe lack of alignment with a team impacts the outcome of a task of project. (TINYpulse)
  2. 86% of employees and executives cite lack of collaboration or ineffective communication for workplace failures. (Salesforce)
  3. Less than 50% say that their organizations discuss organization issues truthfully and effectively. (Salesforce)
  4. 40% of employees believe that decision makers “consistently failed” to seek another opinion. (Salesforce)
  5. 40% of organizations lack a collaboration strategy altogether. (Dimension Data)
  6. 39% of employees believe that people in their organization don’t collaborate enough (Professional Service Centre)
  7. 20% to 35% of value-added collaborations typically come from only 3% to 5% of employees. (Oscar Berg)
  8. 20% of organizational “stars” don’t contribute to the success of their colleagues after they have hit their own numbers and earned kudos for it. (Oscar Berg)
  9. Only 18% of employees get communication evaluation at their performance review. (Queens University)
  10. People tend to lie more when collaborating on a joint effort when they believe it will result in a better outcome for both, if they engage in collusion. (Oscar Berg)
  11. People primed to think of themselves in an organizational context (e.g., co-worker) felt less motivated to reciprocate and did reciprocate less than those in an otherwise parallel personal (e.g., friend or acquaintance) situation. Organizational contexts reduce people’s obligation to follow the moral imperative of the norm of reciprocity. (Oscar Berg)

The facts say to me although the vast majority of people believe there are significant benefits to collaboration, what we believe is not often what we practice and do.

What do these facts about collaboration say to you? Are they are a surprise? Does your business need help is creating a culture of collaboration?

Top 10 marketing KPIs every business needs to know 0

Posted on September 25, 2017 by Rob Petersen

KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) are measurable values that demonstrates how effectively a company is achieving key business objectives. Organizations use KPIs to evaluate their success at reaching targets.  KPIs are the actionable scorecard that keeps business strategy on track.

Here’s a brief, video explanation on KPIs from Erica Olsen at On Strategy.

According to Peter Drucker, marketing and innovation are the two chief functions of any business. Marketing is the distinguishing, unique function of the business. The aim of marketing is to know the customer so well the product or service fits him and sells itself.

What are the right KPIs to evaluate marketing effectiveness. Here are 10 marketing KPIs every business needs to know.

1. REVENUE OR PROFITS: In most cases, KPIs are designed to follow the money. If your a sales driven company, booked revenue is the monetary metric that determines the business’ vitality and health. Profit is perhaps the most important monetary metric. Profit is revenue after all the expenses related to the manufacture, production and selling of products. Profits go to owners, shareholder or are reinvested in the company.  Marketing KPIs have to ladder up to either  revenue or profits to show their impact on the business and its ability to grow.

Marketing KPIs - Profits

2. CUSTOMER VALUE:Understanding customer value is by far the most important thing you can do to identify ways to grow your business. If you understand the value of your customers you can: 1) Determine which customers to invest in, 2) Identify new customers and markets to target, 3) Agree which product and service lines should be offered and 3) Change pricing and promote to extract more value. Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) is the metric that defines customer value. It can be an intimidating calculation to some. It has a defined formula and is a marketing KPI that is definitely worth knowing.

Marketing KPIs - customer lifetime value

3. COST PER ACQUISITION (CPA): With the knowledge of the value of a customer, the next marketing KPIs is how much does it cost to acquire a customer. Cost Per Acquisition or Cost Per Action is a primary metric for any marketing initiative. It is the cost for a visitor, prospect or lead to take a desired action or conversion. It is one of the key drivers in determining the impact of marketing.

Marketing KPIs - CPA

4. NEW AND RETURNING VISITORS:  If you’ve never compared the data for your new and returning website visitors, I suggest taking a stab at it. Reviewing the statistics about the different types of visitors to your site can help you answer questions like: 1) Are my visitors engaged? 2) Do my visitors keep coming back to me (my website) for more information? The primary place where new vs. returning visitors can be found is the Google Analytics of your website. Knowing the numbers and the ratio give you the primary information you need to know about growth possibilities for your business and where they are most likely to come from.

Marketing KPIs - New vs Returning Visitors

5. TRAFFIC SOURCES:  In Web analytics, including Google Analytics, traffic sources is a report that provides an overview of the different kinds of sources that send traffic to your web site. They include:

6. MARKETING QUALIFIED LEADS (MQL); A marketing qualified lead (MQL) is a prospect already in your lead-tracking system, who has expressed interest in buying your product and passes a set of lead qualifications in order to progress further down the funnel. Marketing qualified lead definitions are typically used by B2B companies to identify a stage in the buyer’s journey. For example, in order to become a marketing qualified lead a prospective customer may have to have a certain number of employees in their company, be in a certain vertical or industry, or have a certain revenue.

Marketing KPIs - Marketing Qualified Leads

7. CONVERSION RATE: The conversion rate is the percentage of users who take a desired action. The archetypical example of conversion rate is the percentage of website visitors who buy something on the site. Conversion rate optimization is important because it allows you to lower your customer acquisition costs by getting more value from the visitors and users you already have. By optimizing your conversion rate you can increase revenue per visitor, acquire more customers, and grow your business.

Marketing KPIs - Conversion Rate

8. RESPONSE TIME: The length of time it takes for a person in the system to react to a given stimulus or event. In any service business, response time plays a significant role in retaining customers.

Marketing KPIs - Response Time

9. AVERAGE ORDER VALUE: Average Order Value (AOV) is an ecommerce metric that measures the average total of every order placed with a merchant over a defined period of time. AOV is one of the most important metrics for online stores to be aware of, driving key business decisions such as advertising spend, store layout, and product pricing. Even though average order value is primarily used in ecommerce, it is a KPI worth knowing for any business.

Marketing KPIs - Average Order Value

RETURN ON MARKETING INVESTMENT (ROMI): Marketing ROI is one of the terms most commonly used to describe marketing success, sometimes referred to as the holy grail of marketing KPIs. The definition of the ROI calculation must be consistent with the financial definition to maintain credibility with finance. The formula in its simplest form is below.

Does your business measure these Marketing KPIs? Does your business need help figuring them out?

 

10 influencer marketing case studies get to real results 0

Posted on September 18, 2017 by Rob Petersen

sInfluencer Marketing Case Studies

Influencer marketing is the fastest growing customer acquisition channel according to a poll by Tomoson.

  • 88% of customers trust online reviews and recommendations from people they don’t know as much as from friends (Bright Local)
  • 84% marketers have at least one influencer marketing campaign planned for 2017 (Smart Insights)
  • 51% of marketers believe they acquire better customer through influencer marketing (Tomoson)

What are the results driving this interest. Here are 10 influencer marketing case studies that get to the real results.

  1. ABSOLUT: Wants to create awareness and engagement in 8 key countries. They use Brand Ambassadors to create posts for #AbsolutNights. Each post begins the phrase “You know those #AbsolutNights when…” and then a sentence with a beautiful image explaining the content. 225+ posts are created in 8 countries over 17 weeks. They generate a reach of 2,800,000, 65,000 interactions for an engagement rate of 2.34%.
  2. ADDIDAS: Wants to push content to their German sportswear market during Summer Olympic Games in Rio in the first ‘Influencer Games’. For the campaign, Adidas sent 20 popular influencers to Rio. The team includes fashion bloggers and celebrity models – such as Germany’s Next Top Model winner and top Instagrammer, Lena Gerke. In Rio, the influencers producd social media content promoting the Olympics. Over 54 million Germans go on the watch the Olympics.
  3. BEAUTYCON (L’OREAL): Has become an iconic convention and event where the most daring and bold individuals. L’Oreal sponsors 9 macro influencers, each a heavy-hitter in the digital beauty community. One of the top performers in L’Oreal’s campaign is Chantel Jefferies. Known by her 3 million fans for her sun-kissed aesthetic and fashionable outfits, Chantel’s single post found over 225,000 likes, 1,100 comments, and an engagement rate of 15% among these influencer marketing case studies.
  4. BIGELOW TEA: Wants to promote their products, and encourage healthy living. Influencers incorporate Bigelow tea into their content in different ways. Some create original recipes using it, and others turn the packaging into DIY art. Blogger Ashley Thurman, of Cherished Bliss, provides her readers with a recipe to make iced tea with Bigelow tea and lemonade ice cubes. Jess, of A Million Moments provides her readers with a guide to creating beautiful flower pots from the tea packaging. The bloggers manage to generate more than 32,000 blog page engagements for their sponsored posts. Total media value for Bigelow Tea increases more than threefold, and the brand experiences an 18.5% increase in sales.
  5. BONOBOS: A men’s clothing line, wants to promote their Summer 2016 Collection through social media, and digital marketing campaigns. They launch, among these influencer marketing case studies, the #BetterThanAC campaign to promote the idea that the new Bonobos collection is designed to keep men cool. To leverage this campaign, they work with Foster Huntington, an influential videographer and photographer. The influencer creates several posts showcasing Bonobos clothing in the midst of outdoor summer moments. The campaign yields 5.1 million impressions, and more than 68,200 engagements in the form of likes, shares, and comments.
  6. IKEA: Launches their first influencer campaign for IKEA Germany with YouTubers. The brand hopes that stars’ fans would respond positively to the social content. Celebrity YouTubers from Germany – including Klein aber Hannah and beauty guru Sara Desideria – set an interior design challenge by IKEA. Their task is to transform a blank canvas into a stylishly decorated living space – all within their 180 minute time limit. The vlogs capturing these challenges were uploaded to YouTube, where they quickly gain over 300,000 views and received thousands of audience engagements.
  7. HULU: Wants to promote their new show, “Casual,” and reach their existing audience, as well as the audience of  Thrillist, a men’s digital lifestyle brand among these influencer marketing case studies. They need someone influential to get the word out. So they decide to work with TV personality Andi Dorfman, who previously starred in, “The Bachelorette.” She is invited to the show’s event premiere. She then entices her social media fans with images from the event, through which she shared her experience. Her posts include hashtags like #keepitcasual and #casualonhulu to promote the new show. These images and other images from the event are then added to a landing page on Thrillist. Through just one influencer, Hulu is able to reach more than 1.3 million people. The influencer’s content generates high levels of engagement, with over 13,000 likes, 81 comments, and 96 shares. Andi’s appearance at the event helps build hype for the new TV show, enabling Hulu to achieve their goal.
  8. LEESA.COM: The direct-to-consumer mattress company, Leesa, wantes to win the trust of their target audience through unbiased reviews. Since they only sell online, online reviews sre the best way for the company to prove that their products are worth the investment. They work with influencers who could generate high levels of engagement. To find the right influencers for their campaign, the brand focuses on follower engagement rates rather than number of followers. Blogs like Sleepopolis review the mattresses from Leesa, and provide their readers with their unbiased reviews, The bloggers also provide their readers with a coupon code to help them save money on their purchase. Leesa was able to drive more than 400 mattress sales, and 100,000 clicks to the brand’s website.
  9. NORDSTROM: To promote its Anniversary Sale, Nordstrom partners with 22 Instagram influencers to create 46 sponsored posts on Instagram. The vast majority of the influencers involve were millennial females with fashion-focused feeds. They range from up-and-coming fashion Instagrammers with around 100,000 followers to some of the most well-known fashion influencers in the industry. The Instagram influencer campaign has generated 1.1M likes and 10K comments, with a total engagement rate of 6.3%.
  10. PEDIGREE: Wants to humanize their brand by standing up for a cause. The brand runs, “Buy a Bag, Give a Bowl,” campaign to support a national effort, and amplifies it with the help of influencers. The influencers promote the campaign through their social media content, blog posts, and video content. Influencers like Kristyn Cole help promote the campaign on Instagram by sharing touching stories about their pets to appeal to their followers’ emotions. The campaign helps Pedigree increase their total media value 1.3 times, and generates more than 43 million impressions, and 62,800+ content views. The campaign drives 9,300 blog page engagements, and helped Pedigree win the love of their target audience.

Are you convinced from the results of these influencer marketing case studies? Does your company need help with influencer marketing?

 

 

10 inspiring social media case studies in disaster response 0

Posted on September 11, 2017 by Rob Petersen

social media case studies in disaster response

Social media case studies in disaster response show social media as a vital communication vehicle and database to government agencies and communities. And how they use both the networks and technology available in life saving ways.

Consider these facts for people who have survived a disaster:

  • 76% contact friends to make sure they are safe
  • 37% use info on social media to buy supplies and seek shelter
  • 35% post a request for help on a first responder’s Facebook page (Source: Emergency Management)

To view more facts, there is an infographic at the bottom of these social media case studies in disaster response.

Here are 10 inspiring social media case studies in disaster response.

  1. AMERICAN RED CROSS: The Red Cross has been at the forefront of social media case studies in disaster response using its social media accounts to serve communities in an emergency. BLOG: The Red Cross blog covers many topics related to the organization and its mission. During active disasters, the blog is the primary tool for sharing disaster-related information. FACEBOOK: The Red Cross’ Facebook page, which has more than 830,000+ Likes, serves as a community forum for providing information, sharing and discussing current issues, and learning how to take action and donate funds. FLICKR: The Red Cross’ extensive volunteer network operating in many locations provides a substantial database of photos of impacted communities and relief efforts. PINTEREST: The Red Cross uses Pinterest to give visitors the ability to pin Red Cross-related images to their own pinboards and share information through social media platforms.
  2. CITY OF NEW ORLEANS, HURRICANE ISSAC (2012): Early on, reports indicated that Florida would be in the storm’s path during the same week as the scheduled Republican National Convention. As the storm changed its path and headed toward New Orleans, official organizations such as the National Hurricane Center, the National Weather Service, FEMA, and the City of New Orleans used #Isaac and #NOLA consistently on social media networks to clarify alerts and warnings. The New Orleans mayor’s Twitter account was used to respond directly to community members’ Twitter messages and to correct misinformation. Community members posted eyewitness videos and photos of damages and reported utility outages, flooding locations, and road closures. FEMA and the City of New Orleans used this information to plan their response efforts.
  3. CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO: The city uses a text-based notification system, AlertSF, and encourages its Twitter followers to sign up for those alerts and AlertSF subscribers to use Twitter. More information is pushed onto Twitter, such as traffic and weather details. AlertSF is used solely for emergencies because officials do not want to clutter people’s cell phones with messages, Dudgeon said. The city also uses an outdoor public warning system.
  4. FEMA APP: With hurricane season continuing through November 30, the FEMA app is an essential tool to help your family weather the storm, nationwide. Receive weather alerts from the National Weather Service for up to five different locations anywhere in the United States. Learn what to do before, during and after emergencies with safety tips. This is a free app.
  5. MAKE AMERICA SAFER THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA COMMUNITY: The Make America Safer through Social Media community, led by Hal Grieb of Plano, is collecting the best practices of the different social media tools available, DHS’ Vazquez said.Members of the network can engage in specific forums, contribute to blogs and wikis, post documents, share calendars, and bookmark content from the Internet. Members also have profiles that give details about their accreditations, association memberships, credentials, training, and areas of interest related to job activities, such as social media. “They have a level of trust that we, the government, can verify that the people there are also first responders and have a need to know information” related to emergency management, Vazquez said.“In many ways, it gives [first responders] a social collaboration tool similar to Facebook and LinkedIn,” he said, “but the difference is that this is a controlled environment.”
  6. PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI, 2010 EARTHQUAKE (2010): After the Haiti earthquake, hundreds of volunteers around the world, dubbed in the media as “digital humanitarians.” As part of the effort, the volunteers first completed the digital mapping of the country using satellite imagery. An open source interactive mapping solution called Ushahidi Platform was then used to map geotagged Twitter messages and other mappable content from hundreds of other online sources. Another successful venture during the Haiti crisis, the American Red Cross’ charity text message campaign, took advantage of smartphone and SMS messaging technology. The campaign raised more than $22 million for Haiti relief within only a few days of the earthquake, thereby demonstrating the power of mobile technology. The charity’s previous record for a text-based campaign was $400,000.
  7. QUEENLAND FLOODS (2010): Long lasting and intensive rainfalls over large areas of north eastern Australia during the wet season of 2010 led to large flooding in Queensland. Nearly seventy-eight per cent of the state of Queensland had been declared a disaster zone in this example of social media case studies in disaster response. The QPS used Social Media streams during the 2011 flood disaster mostly to get information and warnings out to their following community and the public. They wanted to act as a centralised clearing house for disaster-related information. The need for verified informations two significant boosts of “Likes” on Facebook. The first boost occurred in December 2010 and doubled in number. About 14,000 people followed the QPS Facebook account by the end of December 2010. The second more powerful boost occurred after the flash flooding events of Toowoomba and the Lockyer Valley on the 10th of January 2011, and at the beginning of the flooding of Brisbane on the 11th January. “Likes” of the QPS Facebook page increased from 14,000 to over 160,000
  8. TORONTO POLlCE SERVICE: The Toronto Police Service (TPS) has taken an aggressive approach to social media. By mid-2012, it had trained 300 staff to use networking tools such as Twitter, Facebook and blogs. One example of this strategy emerged when police were conducting a manhunt in a residential community. The suspect was regarded as armed and dangerous; as a precaution, some schools were locked down and homes secured. By following keywords and hashtags (a symbol used tomark keywords or topics), the TPS were able to monitor what the community was saying about the incident. In doing so, they were able to correct misinformation, dispel rumors and provide assurance that police were on the scene.
  9. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY: The U.S. Geological Survey is developing a prototype site that monitors Twitter feeds to provide scientists with real-time data about earthquakes in this example of social media case studies in disaster response. The goal of the Twitter Earthquake Detector effort is to demonstrate a way to rapidly detect earthquakes and provide an initial damage assessment. TED taps into the Twitter API and searches for keywords such as “earthquake.” It then pulls and aggregates the information, including photographs, to give USGS scientists a map based on the number of tweets coming from a geographic area. That information is useful because there is a time lag between an earthquake and its official verification.
  10. VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (VDEM): Launched an emergency management system — the Virginia Interoperability Picture for Emergency Response — that has transformed how it prepares for emergencies and responds to disasters. VIPER is a geospatial information system-based enterprise platform that integrates with numerous information systems and links with approximately 250 data feeds. It supplies a Web-based common operating picture and numerous analysis tools. Emergency commanders; first responders; and police, fire and government officials can tap into a single information resource to gain an accurate understanding of events.

Do these case studies convince you of the value of social media in disaster response. To help your understanding, here is an infographic of the ways that it is used.

15 eCommerce case studies show big results from small changes 0

Posted on September 04, 2017 by Rob Petersen

ecommerce case studies

eCommerce case studies show how regular audits and improvements to a website produce big results from seemingly small changes.

That’s because most of us now prefer to buy online, especially Millennials. And businesses that make the process easier, simpler and more seamless are going to see the benefits. Consider these facts:

  • 85% of customers start a purchase on one device and finish it on another. (Google)
  • 67% of Millennials and 56% of Gen Xers prefer to shop on online rather than in-store. (Big Commerce)
  • 51% of Americans prefer to shop online. (Big Commerce)

Just what happens?

Here are 15 eCommerce case studies that show big results from small changes.

  1. BANDAGES PLUS: Is an eCommerce site that sells compression therapy supplies, bandages, tapes, ready-made kits and more. Bandages Plus serves a unique audience specifically looking for their products. They segmented products into categories that included best sellers, high-margin items and others. The segmentation was reflected in their Paid Search ad campaigns which targeted ads by user groups. The improvements resulted in a 50% increase in both transactions and revenue.
  2. COMPANY FOLDER: Makes custom folders and wanted to remedy their online quote function. This was a vital step in their marketing funnel, so making the process as smooth as possible was essential to ultimately driving more sales for the business. They took a cumbersome single step process with lots of options and broke it up into a multi-step bite size process. Doing this resulted in a whopping 67.68% increase in total quotes.
  3. DIAMOND CANDLES: Is a company that features rings beneath the wax of its candles. By utilizing customer-contributed photos on its Facebook page, Diamond Candles upped conversion rates and attracted more than 290,000 new Facebook fans.
  4. DIVA: Is a fashion retail chain based in Australia with more than 160 stores worldwide. Slow load times and functional obstacles created challenges for conversions among eCommerce case studies. Site improvements were implemented such as: 1) Removing obstacles and diversions to the Shopping Cart when the user wanted to keep shopping, 2) speeding up the site via site enhancements and Google Page Speed Service and 3) improving social sharing and proof. The results was average revenue per visitor was up 92%
  5. EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS: Offered customers a same-day delivery option but people weren’t taking advantage of the offer because they didn’t know about it. To educate customers about this option they significantly increased visibility with a large banner in an extremely prominent position on the homepage, just below the navigation bar and featured a countdown timer to the deadline for same day delivery. It was impossible to miss or misunderstand. What is the result of this simple countdown feature among our eCommerce case studies? An increase in same-day sales by 8%.
  6. ENVELOPES.COM: Wanted to see if they could “rekindle the flame” and land some sales from hot leads using target followups. So they tested out email sends at two alternate time lapses post cart abandonment; the first group sent the following morning at 11 am and the second group 48 hours post cart abandonment.  Although both did well, the emails sent 48 hours later delivered the best conversion rate and sales with: 1) An open rate of 38.0%, 2)  a click-through rate of 24.7% and 3) a conversion rate of 40.0%
  7. EXPRESS WATCHES: Debated whether to communicate a lowest price guarantee versus a stamp of authenticity on their website. They tested variants with both, each telling a different story about the clientele: bargain hunters vs aficionados. The results were pretty surprising. By labeling the site with a badge of authenticity, Express Watches saw an increase in online sales of 107%. A huge differential from the price based messaging, simply from a little seal of authenticity.
  8. HOUSEPLANS.NET: Is an eCommerce site that sells ready-designed house plans direct to consumers. The audit revealed some issues that could be addressed with a thorough link audit and cleanup. A Content Audit found opportunities to improve the site quality as a whole and clean up indexation in Google. That process involved pruning underperforming content on the site, which turned out to be close to 80% of all product pages. This resulted in a 434% increase in organic traffic revenue over the previous year.
  9. LILGADGETS HEADPHONES: Sold its headphones exclusively on Amazon. The idea was to offer parents a choice they didn’t previously have in the children headphones market — a simple and clean look with amazing sound and premium components. But to stand out and create a competitive advantage, Lilgadgets needed to build a brand, which meant developing a site of their own. They made sure to offer a custom checkout experience where customer could see where they were in the process and what was left to complete. The result was: 1) A 38.3% lift in peak conversions, 2) an average conversion rate of 8% and 3) conversions have risen despite advertising campaigns that have increased site traffic by 80%.
  10. MODERN COIN MART: The self-described “Modern Coin Superstore” added a simple trustmark to its eCommerce site to ease customers’ anxieties about the purchasing process. A tiny graphic produced monumental results among our eCommerce case studies, boosting sales conversions to 14%.
  11. PAPERSTONE: Is a small paper company that competes with large brand big box stores like Staples and Viking. With most people defaulting to the brands they know best, Paperstone needed to find a way to leverage their strengths against the competition; lower prices.
  12. RADICALGOLFCARTS.COM: Is an eCommerce store selling aftermarket golf cart parts and accessories. They overhauled their website with changes such as: 1) Fix a SSL Certificate Issue on the site, which caused some browsers to prompt users in the cart with a warning the site was susceptible to hackers, 2) use a Favicon, the little icon seen at the top of tabs and in browser bookmarks is the unsung hero on online branding and conversions, 3) increase the presence of Free Shipping on the site and 3) elevate the presence of Trust Factors in the Cart and Checkout. When the pieces came together, sales were up 66%,
  13. TOTAL HOME SUPPLY: Is an eCommerce site that specializes in selling products for private homes and businesses, such as air conditioners, heaters, fireplaces and appliances, as well as other home and business needs. There was no call tracking to determine where conversions were coming from, and lack of tracking made it hard to determine the full value of their ad campaigns. Call tracking was implemented to better understand conversion. The call tracked increased cost 9%, but revenue increased 199%.
  14. UNDERWATER AUDIO: Had a problem with visitors who were in the middle of their sales funnel, researching specific products but then dropping off at the comparison page. When they noticed this leak they decided to get to the bottom of it. The new version did away with the data tables, streamlined the text, and put everything above the fold. The redesigned page had an increase in online sales of 40.8%
  15. WINE ENTHUSIAST: Put content into play to earn trust with consumers. The company’s website features wine reviews, articles and videos to help build an audience. The content helped yield a 50% increase in monthly email opt-ins.

Do these eCommerce case studies convince you of the big results possible from small changes? Does your eCommerce business need to be examined to see you can improve?

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