How to build a strategy for social influence in 8 steps 0

Posted on January 18, 2015 by Rob Petersen

 

 

social influence

  • 78% of people say companies’ social media posts impact their purchase decisions
  • 71% are more likely to make a purchase based on social media referrals
  • 25% of social media users have purchased a product after sharing it or marking it as a Favorite on Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest (source: Digital Information World; an infographic from invesp is below)

These facts show social influence plays an important role in our purchase decisions.

Social influence is a reason companies turn to social media. But, to get desired results, there has to be a strategy: A roadmap with guiding principles that defines a plan, actions and measurements to achieve success.

Is social influence a reason your business is in social media? Do you have a strategy?

Here’s how to build a business strategy for social influence in 8 steps.

  1. DO RESEARCH TO IDENTIFY INFLUENCERS: Find out who is talking about your brand, industry or key topics. Start with social listening tools like HootSuite, or Topsy using keywords. Look at their website rank, audience and links through Alexa: influence with Klout; measure the size of the social network followings. Assemble a list of dozen or more potential influencers to begin building key influencer relationships.
  2. ESTABLISH RELATIONSHIPS BASED ON SHARED VALUES: Whether you pay influencers or rewards them with your own products and services, the basis of the relationship has to begin with shared values. Kim Kardashian is reported to get $25,000 a tweet for Armani. I guest post on websites of colleagues like Mark Schaefer’s {Grow} and Mike Moran’s, Biznology blogs to increase outreach. There’s a big difference in the currency but, in both cases, there is a similarity in that the relationships are based on shared values.
  3. DON’T USE INFLUENCERS TO SELL BUT TO TEACH SOMETHING NEW: Influencers are deeply involved in their community, whether it’s a school district or friends who share similar interests in cooking or working on their cars. Influencers arrange their lives to collect information about things they’re passionate about. Their community relies on them to be the first to find out about the things in which they’re most interested.
  4. PUBLISH OR PERISH: Relevant content is the key ingredient to any social influence program. Your audience expects it on a regular basis. Don’t disappoint them. Publish regularly behind a schedule with sufficient resources. Create a Content Calendar to guide, direct and manage this key task. As examples, HubSpot has a good template and CoShedule is a more recent service that prolific bloggers recommend.
  5. CONTRIBUTE A MIX OF CONTENT TO THE CONVERSATION: Content is anything but a singular asset. It can cover a range from: blog posts, images, videos, reviews, testimonials, surveys, newsletters, case studies, how-to-tips, ebooks, product in use or demonstrations to you get the idea. If you need more ideas, here are 101 different types of content.
  6. BE THERE WITH CUSTOMER CARE AND SERVICE: If your social influence program is working, your product or service may not for some of your customers. They will use your community to talk about a product that malfunctioned or didn’t work properly for them; or maybe just to sound off. You have to be prepared for these events and have guidelines for managing unruly conversations. Here are some tips to deal with angry customers in social media.
  7. MEASURE PROGRESS AND BE FLEXIBLE TO CHANGE: Every strategy requires a measurement plan with Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to guide success. A social influence program is both within and without your control so there is always going to be an element of the unexpected. If you listen for it and are flexible to change, it’s likely to work to your advantage.
  8. DON’T EXPECT ANY SHORT CUTS: Social influence is a good use of social media, especially in an integrated marketing mix where specific channels have focused business requirements. A key benefit to a social influence initiative is that your business is earning audience trust. When something is earned, it tends to last longer. But there is rarely a shortcut to earning anything.

Are you in social media for social influence purposes? Do these steps help with your strategy? Do you need more help in developing your social influencer strategy?

Social media influence

35 data points show how content marketing works 0

Posted on January 12, 2015 by Rob Petersen

 

 

How Content Marketig Works

  • 90% of marketers use content marketing (source: e-Strategy Trends)
  • 44% have a documented content marketing strategy (Source: Flip Creator)
  • 42% of B2B marketers and 34% of B2C marketers believe they are effective at it (source: e-Strategy Trends)

These statistics indicate content marketing has come of age but there is still room for improvement.

What makes it work? How should your business use it?

Here is some guidance. 35 data points that show how content marketing work.

CONTENT IS KING

  • 78% of CMOs believe custom content is the future of marketing (source: Social Times)
  • 76% use articles (including internal and guest blog posts) (source: eMarketer)
  • 76% of B2B companies maintain blogs. (FlipCreator)
  • 70% of both B2B and B2C marketers plan to produce more content (source: e-Strategy Trends)
  • 62% use videos (source: eMarketer)
  • 60% of consumers feel more positive about a brand after consuming content from it. (source: iMedia Connection)

PEOPLE LIKE TO DO BUSINESS WITH PEOPLE THEY KNOW

  • 70%-90% of the “buying journey” for B2B buyers occurs before they reach out to a vendor (source: B2B Marketing)
  • 80% of the time spent researching is done online (source: B2B Marketing)
  • 54% of B2B buyers begin their buying process with informal research about business problems (source: B2B Marketing)
  • 46% of web users will look towards social media when making a purchase (source: Search Engine Journal)

KNOW WHO TO ATTRACT

  • 57% of discussion on Pinterest are about food (source: Search Engine Journal)
  • 56% of Americans have a profile on a social networking site (source: Edison Research)
  • The fastest-growing age cohort on Twitter is 55-to-64 year-olds, up 79% since 2012 (source: Fast Company)
  • 50% of marketers found customers on Facebook (source: Social Times)
  • 45-54 age bracket is the fastest-growing group on both Facebook and Google+ (source: Fast Company)
  • 40 percent of marketers found customers on LinkedIn (source: Social Times)
  • YouTube has over 1 billion unique visitors per month and reaches the coveted 18-34 year old demographic more than any cable network (source: Search Engine Journal)
  • The male vs. female ratio of social media users is as follows: Facebook – 60% female/40% male; Twitter – 60% female/40% male; Pinterest – 79% female/21% male; Google Plus – 29% female/71% male; LinkedIn – 55% female/45% male (source: Search Engine Journal)

HAVE A STRATEGY

  • 83% of B2B marketers invest in social media to increase brand exposure (source: (Social Media Today)
  • 69% to increase web traffic (source: Social Media Today)
  • 65% to gain market insights (source: Social Media Today)
  • 78 cents is the value in sales of a Pin on Pinterest (up 25% versus year ago) (source: TechCrunch)

MAKE YOUR CONTENT WORK AS HARD AS IT CAN

  • 4,300% is the ROI of email marketing (source: Search Engine Journal)
  • 80% of all Pinterest pins are actually Re-pins (source: Search Engine Journal)
  • 73% of reporters say that press releases should contain images. (Social Times)
  • 72% who complain on Twitter expect a response within 60 minutes (source: HubSpot)
  • 57% of U.S. online adults read blogs. And of that group, two-thirds “say a brand mention or promotion within context of the blog influences their purchasing decisions.” (source: New Media and Marketing)
  • 52% of people expect a response to an email within 12-24 hours (source: MediaPost)
  • 48% of consumers say email is their preferred form of communication with brands. (iMedia Connection)
  • 42% of people expect a response from brands on social media within 60 minutes; 32% within 30 minutes (source: Convince and Convert)
  • 23% of Facebook users check their account at least 5 times a day (source: Search Engine Journal)
  • YouTube has the highest engagement and lowest bounce of any social network (source: Shareaholic)

ADMIT WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW

  • 79% of B2B marketing executives report noticeable skill gaps in the teams they manage. The top areas for skills gaps are:
    • Data analysis
    • Customer insight
    • Digital marketing techniques. (source: B2B Marketing)

Do these data point help you see what makes content marketing work? Could you be doing content marketing more effectivley?

14 case studies show great digital creative drives ROI 0

Posted on January 03, 2015 by Rob Petersen

 

 

Show me the ROIDoes great creative drive ROI?

We certainly think it should.

Here are 14 case studies that highlight creative on digital campaigns. They include brands from B2C, B2B, small business, large brands, profit and non-profit. Tactics range from paid, owned and earned media to user generated content.

In each case, the impact of the creative idea is isolated and measured. We found great creative drives ROI. But it drives even greater ROI when it is combined with smart targeting, sound strategic thinking and has a specific business role in the overall marketing mix.

Here are 14 case studies that show great digital creative drives ROI.

  1. ADP: Developed a content marketing campaign to connect and engage with their target audience on a ADP solution using white papers and a diagnostic assessment tool. The campaign generated over $1 million in new sales opportunities with several deals closed within the first 3 months of launch.
  2. ALS ASSOCIATION: Created the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. It relied on user generated content and is, to date, the most successful viral social media campaign ever. In one month, over $100 million dollars was donated versus $2.6 million in the year ago period. Over 6.000.000 people created their own Ice Bucket Challenge video and posted it on YouTube. Participants included (George Bush, Barak Obama), business leaders (Mark Zuckerberg) to celebrities (Matt Damon, Charlie Sheen), many people of influence have given their implied endorsement by taking the Ice Bucket challenge.  Traffic to the organization’s website, alsa.org, ranked as the 648 most viewed website in the US and 4.192 in the world (an improvement in rank of 168,792 within 3 months) according to Alexa.
  3. COCA-COLA: Used the digital channel to “Share A Coke.” The campaign gave people the chance to order personalized Coke bottles through a Facebook app. resulting in a 7% increase in sales. It also earned a total of more than 18 million media impressions, and traffic on the Coke Facebook site increased by 870%, with ‘Likes’ growing by 39%.
  4. CREME EGG: Invited consumers, in a seasonal social media campaign, to ‘Have a fling with Crème Egg’ on Facebook. They created a long series of one-off posts that fed into an overall narrative across the three months. With one third of the spending in Facebook compared to TV. Facebook matched TV in driving brand consideration. ROI research showed consumers exposed to both TV and Facebook were 66 per cent more likely to purchase than the expected combined effect of both. Creme Egg saw a 7% increase in sales.
  5. IKEA: The 2014 IKEA catalogue came to life this year taking the customer experience further with extended digital content. To unlock 50 pages of digital content, including videos, furnishing tips and room designs, users needed to download the IKEA catalogue app, scan the plus logo in the catalogue with their smartphone or tablet and have access to a variety of digital content. One of the features was an augmented reality capability which allows customers to view and place selected 3D virtual IKEA products in their own rooms. The app was downloaded 8.5 million times.
  6. LOGICALLS: A global IT and managed services provider, used content assets such as emails, microsite and ebook, Logicalis developed a thought leadership effort that supported sales teams by enabling custom messaging based on the prospects interaction with the campaign. With a target audience of about 2,000, nearly $8 million in new pipeline business was closed.
  7. MERCEDES: For the launch of the new Mercedes A-class, Mercedes wanted to appeal to a younger generation of drivers in the UK. The idea behind the campaign was to reach out to young people watching TV while interacting with a mobile or tablet device. Showing the commercial during prime time TV (during the X Factor) and using the hastage #YOUDRIVE, viewers were encouraged to use Twitter to determine the outcome of the story. Brochure requests increased by 140%, exceeding the original goal and on social media the hashtag appeared 103 million times on Twitter and 30 million times on Facebook. The #YOUDRIVE website was visited by over 740,000 people and the YouTube trailer viewed 237,000 times and had a very impressive 95% completion rate.
  8. NILLA WAFERS: Used Facebook to change perception of a brands that was seen as old to one that for those who are young at heart. Through a campaign of posts that showed everything from versatile and new uses, they measured engagement. By combining likes, comments, shares, and estimated impressions to create an engagement score, Nilla Wafers was found to have a score of 557 against 46 posts during the prior period. This is a massive 11 times higher than the U.S. Food sector average. The campaign produced a 9% increase in sales.
  9. PICON: Wanted to revamp its brand promise of ‘spreading happiness’ across Lebanon. The FMCG brand’s civic activism programme became part of the country’s school curriculum via some smart digital marketing. Each area of civic activism was represented by a Lebanese superhero, who represented the programme as an ambassador and spoke about the effort to the media. Picon developed ‘Happiness Heroes’, a program that taught civic education to school children and allowed them to apply those lessons outside of the classroom through civic works projects. The campaign reached 6,700 students. Together, those students collected two and a half tons of bottle caps, recycled two tons of paper, and planted 1,250 trees. The students also helped 158 families in need, entertained 2,000 seniors, renovated 15 public schools, and helped 550 people with special needs participate in sports events. Picon estimated the company garnered $1.8 million in earned media and reached 2.5 million people.
  10. SAMSUNG: To promote its latest Galaxy camera, this global campaign from Samsung targeted the millennial community who regularly upload photos to social media. The electronics giant created a social media marketing campaign –dubbed ‘Life’s a Photo Take It’ – using young influencers to demonstrate the key differences between the quality of images from a normal smartphone and the Samsung Galaxy camera- getting results that blew away expectations.  Purchase intent grew by 115% with Tumblr pictures and YouTube videos getting over 1,000,000 views (300% higher than expected).
  11. SMART BALANCE: Grew its US market share by 14%, giving power brands such as Flora, Country Crock and I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter! something to worry about. They introduced new health/nutrition content, recipes, seasonal promotions and coupons, and streamlined navigation across the site. Site visits were up by 42% and time spent on site has increased 27%, while bounce rates decreased by more than 16%. Several thousand coupons were delivered and the Smart Balance email database grew over 15-fold.
  12. SNICKERS: Targeted fat-fingered typists across the UK, this clever search campaign from Snickers used misspelled words in Google keywords to capture hungry office workers’ attention during the working day. The concept was to bid on commonly misspelt words with an advert reading “Grab yourself a Snikkers” as “Yu cant spel properlie wen hungrie”. the campaign smashed their target of 500,000 people within just three days of launch – showing that with a little creativity, search continues to throw up opportunities for increasingly cost-effective marketing.
  13. WILKINSON SWORD: Ran a #DADICATION social campaign in the to coincide with Father’s Day. It setup a booth in London so that members of the public could record video messages paying tribute to their dads.  A montage of some of these clips was posted on YouTube to promote a Facebook competition that allowed people to win one of 20,000 personalized razors for their dad, a Wilkinson goodie bag or a day out at a brewery. The YouTube ad has been viewed more than 1,300,000 times and many people left tributes on the Wilkinson Facebook page.
  14. XEROX: Created a targeted “Get Optimistic” campaign to connect with 30 top accounts and partnered with Forbes to create a magazine that offered relevant business tips. 70% of targeted companies interacted with the microsite, readership increased 300-400% over previous email campaigns, added 20,000 new contacts, generated 1,000+ scheduled appointments, and get this: yielded $1.3 billion in pipeline revenue.

Do these examples show you how great digital creative drives ROI? Do you wish your brand had these kind of creative ideas working for it?

47 facts about Christmas that will surprise you 0

Posted on December 21, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

BarnRaisers ChristmasHappy Holidays from all of us at BarnRaisers. May the New Year unfold everything you hope it does.

The Christmas Spirit is about expressing extra tolerance, charitableness and giving, especially to those who have had a difficult year or are going through trying times. And to be focused on a bright future.

Perhaps, by learning a little more about Christmas, it will give us an appreciation to express this spirit now and in the New Year.

Here are 47 facts about Christmas that will surprise you.

    1. The Bible doesn’t mention when Jesus was actually born. Most historians believe it was the Spring because of shepherds herding animals.
    2. December 25 was probably chosen because it coincided with the ancient pagan festival Saturnalia, which celebrated the agricultural god Saturn with partying, gambling, and gift-giving.
    3. On Christmas Eve during World War I, Allied troops took a break from fighting to sing Christmas Carols. When German soldier emerged they all shook hands exchanging greetings and cigarettes. It was called the Christmas Truce of 1914.
    4. Every year since 1947, the people of Oslo, Norway have given a Christmas tree to the city of Westminster, England. The gift is an expression of good will and gratitude for Britain’s help to Norway during World War II.
    5. Since 1971, the Province of Nova Scotia has presented the Boston Christmas tree to the people of Boston, in gratitude for the relief supplies received from the citizens of Boston after a ship exploded in 1917 following a collision in the Halifax, Nova Scotia Harbor. Part of the city was leveled, killing and injuring thousands.
    6. Because of its roots in pagan festivals, Christmas was not immediately accepted by the religious. In fact, from 1659 to 1681, it was illegal to celebrate Christmas in Boston. You were fined if you were caught celebrating.
    7. Christmas in early America was inconsequential. After the Revolutionary War, Congress didn’t even bother taking the day off to celebrate the holiday, deciding instead to hold its first session on Christmas Day, 1789.
    8. In 1856 Franklin Pierce, the 14th President of the United States, was the first President to place a Christmas tree in the White House.
    9. Teddy Roosevelt banned the Christmas tree from the White House for environmental reasons.
    10. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer got his start as an advertising gimmick. A copywriter named Robert L. May first created the merry misfit in 1939 to lure shoppers into the Montgomery Ward department store.
    11. Rudolph almost didn’t have a red nose either: At the time, a red nose was a sign of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward thought he would look like a drunkard.
    12. Though Santa Claus has worn blue and white and green in the past, his traditional red suit came from a 1930s ad by Coca Cola.
    13. Frosty the Snowman was made famous by a whiskeymaker in 1890 who used Frosty’s likeness to showcase an entirely different kind of holiday cheer. Once Prohibition ended, Frosty quickly became the go-to guy for alcohol ads, appearing in posters for Miller beer, Jack Daniel’s, Ballantine ale, Rheingold beer, Schlitz beer, Schenley, Oretel’s lager beer, Chivas Regal scotch, Fort Pitt pale ale, Mount Whitney beer and Four Roses.
    14. Mistletoe is magical according to Celtic legend. It can heal wounds, increase fertility, bring good luck and ward off evil spirits.
    15. The tradition of kissing under the mistletoe began the Victorian era, surprising (or maybe not) considering the stuffy and sexually repressive behavior of the time.
    16. The use of evergreen trees to celebrate the winter season occurred before the birth of Christ.
    17. Germans decorated evergreen trees to brighten the dark, gloomy days of the winter solstice. The first “Christmas trees” appeared in Strasbourg in the 17th century and spread to Pennsylvania in the 1820s with the arrival of German immigrants.
    18. The Germans made the first artificial Christmas trees out of dyed goose feathers.
    19. Approximately 30-35 million real (living) Christmas trees are sold each year in the U.S.
    20. 98 percent of all Christmas trees are grown on farms, while only 2% are cut from the wild.
    21. Most Christmas trees are cut weeks before they get to a retail outlet. It is important to keep them watered thoroughly when they reach your home. In the first week, a Christmas tree in your home will consume as much as a quart of water per day.
    22. The earliest known Christmas tree decorations were apples. At Christmastime, medieval actors would use apples to decorate paradise trees (usually fir trees) during “Paradise Plays,” which were plays depicting Adam and Eve’s creation and fall.
    23. Thomas Edison’s assistant, Edward Johnson, came up with the idea of electric lights for Christmas trees in 1882. Christmas tree lights were first mass-produced in 1890.
    24. In Finland, Finns visit saunas on Christmas Eve.
    25. In Portugal, Portuguese revelers hold a feast on Christmas Day for the living and the dead (extra places are set for the souls of the deceased).
    26. In Greece, some believe that goblins called kallikantzeri run wild during the 12 days of Christmas, and most Greeks don’t exchange presents until Jan. 1, St. Basil’s Day.
    27. In Australia and New Zealand, most Australians and New Zealanders enjoy Christmas on the beach or at barbecues.
    28. In Spain, the Spanish hold the World’s Largest Lottery on Christmas Day. It is called “El Gordo” or “The Fat One.”
    29. Each year more than 3 billion Christmas cards are sent in the U.S. alone.
    30. In Poland, spiders or spider webs are common Christmas trees decorations because according to legend, a spider wove a blanket for Baby Jesus. In fact, Polish people consider spiders to be symbols of goodness and prosperity at Christmas.
    31. Alabama was the first state in the United States to officially recognize Christmas in 1836.
    32. Christmas wasn’t declared an official holiday in the United States until June 26, 1870.
    33. Oklahoma was the last U.S. state to declare Christmas a legal holiday, in 1907.
    34. The poinsettia is native to Mexico and was cultivated by the Aztecs, who called the plant Cuetlaxochitl (“flower which wilts”). For the Aztecs, the plant’s brilliant red color symbolized purity, and they often used it medicinally to reduce fever.
    35. Contrary to popular belief, the poinsettia is not poisonous, but holly berries are.
    36. Santa Claus is based on a real person, St. Nikolas of Myra (also known as Nikolaos the Wonderworker, Bishop Saint Nicholas of Smyrna, and Nikolaos of Bari), who lived during the fourth century. Born in Patara (in modern-day Turkey), he is the world’s most popular non-Biblical saint, and artists have portrayed him more often than any other saint except Mary.
    37. Santa Claus is based on a real person, St. Nikolas of Myra (also known as Nikolaos the Wonderworker, Bishop Saint Nicholas of Smyrna, and Nikolaos of Bari), who lived during the fourth century. Born in Patara (in modern-day Turkey), he is the world’s most popular non-Biblical saint, and artists have portrayed him more often than any other saint except Mary.
    38. There are two competing claims as to which president was the first to place a Christmas tree in the White House. Some scholars say President Franklin Pierce did in 1856; others say President Benjamin Harrison brought in the first tree in 1889.
    39. President Coolidge started the White House lighting ceremony in 1923.
    40. President Teddy Roosevelt, an environmentalist, banned Christmas trees from the White House in 1912.
    41. There are approximately 21,000 Christmas tree farms in the United States. In 2008, nearly 45 million Christmas trees were planted, adding to the existing 400 million trees.
    42. Christmas is a contraction of “Christ’s Mass,” which is derived from the Old English Cristes mæsse (first recorded in 1038).
    43. The letter “X” in Greek is the first letter of Christ, and “Xmas” has been used as an abbreviation for Christmas since the mid 1500s.
    44. The first person to decorate a Christmas tree was reportedly the Protestant reformer Martin Luther (1483-1546). According to legend, he was so moved by the beauty of the stars shining between the branches of a fir tree, he brought home an evergreen tree and decorated it with candles to share the image with his children.
    45. Christmas purchases account for 1/6 of all retail sales in the U.S.
    46. he first batch of eggnog in America was crafted at Captain John Smith’s Jameston settlement in 1607, and the name eggnog comes from the word “grog,” which refers to any drink made with rum.
    47. “Jingle Bells” was originally supposed to be a Thanksgiving song.

These facts were curated from articles by Time,  Random History, Entertainment Tonight and University of Illinois Extension, with gratitude and appreciation for helping me gain a deeper understanding of Christmas and the Christmas Spirit.

Did they do the same for you?

14 best data visualization tools for better storytelling 2

Posted on November 30, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

Peter Drucker

If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it. – Peter Drucker

This succinct truth says you can’t know whether you are reaching your goal unless success is defined and tracked. Data visualization is technology that lets corporate executives and other end users see data to better understand information in context.

Hundreds of tools are now available to chart, create dashboards and better measure and mange data. They range in price from open source to thousands of dollars per year. They range is sophistication from “drag and drop,” plug-ins and widgets to java script that is likely to involve a web developer.

The growth of data visualization says a mix of data and narrative is now a better way for businesses to tell their story.

Which tools are best to tell your story? While price and software sophistication play a role, the more important criteria are:

  • How you define success?
  • What measures are most important to manage?

Once you’ve answered these questions, here are 14  of the best data visualization tools. They are grouped by categories to help you be a better storyteller with data.

PIE, LINE AND BAR CHARTS

zingchart data visualization

  • DYGRAPHS: is a fast, flexible open source JavaScript charting library. Dygraphs creates chart that are interactive: you can mouse over to highlight individual values. You can click and drag to zoom. Double-clicking will zoom you back out. Shift-drag will pan. You can change the number and hit enter to adjust the averaging period.
  • jqPLOT: Is a plotting and charting plugin for the jQuery Javascript framework. jqPlot produces beautiful line, bar and pie charts. qPlot is an open source project by Chris Leonello.
  • ZING CHART: is a JavaScript charting library and feature-rich API set that lets you build interactive Flash or HTML5 charts. It offer over 100 chart types to fit your data.

MAPPING

Instant Atlas data visualization

  • COLOR BREWER: Originally designed with federal funding and developed at Penn State — is really for choosing map colors, and is worth spending some time with if plan to make many more. You can choose your base color and get the codes for the entire palette.
  • EXHIBIT: Developed by MIT, and fully open-source, Exhibit makes it easy to create interactive maps, and other data-based visualizations that are orientated towards teaching or static/historical based data sets, such as flags pinned to countries, or birth-places of famous people.
  • INSTANT ATLAS: enables information analysts and researchers to create highly-interactive dynamic and profile reports that combine statistics and map data to improve data visualization, enhance communication, and engage people in more informed decision making

TIMELINES

Timeline data visualization

  • TIMELINE: Is a fantastic widget which renders a beautiful interactive timeline that responds to the user’s mouse, making it easy to create advanced timelines that convey a lot of information in a compressed space. Each element can be clicked to reveal more in-depth information, making this a great way to give a big-picture view while still providing full detail.
  • HERE IS TODAY: is a great example of an interactive timeline which continues to zoom out to give relative times all based on today. It seems simple, but is an example of several good aspects of data visualization design. It compares today with a month, then a year, then century, etc. It isn’t overwhelming the reader with all the data at once, or forcing the person to choose only one interpretation.
  • TIMEFLOW: Allows you to create time-based diagrams easily and quickly. Designed for journalists, it allows for a variety of different ways to visualise the data and help you understand any underlying trends.

INFOGRAPHICS:

infographic data visualization

  • VISUAL.LY: Is a combined gallery and infographic generation tool. It offers a simple toolset for building stunning data representations, as well as a platform to share your creations. This goes beyond pure data visualisation, but if you want to create something that stands on its own, it’s a fantastic resource and an info-junkie’s dream come true.
  • PIKTOCHART; Is a web-based tool that has good free themes and a whole bunch more for the paid version) for creating simple visualizations. You can drag and drop different shapes and images, and there is quite a bit of customization available. You can also add simple line, bar, and pie charts using data from CSV (or manual entry). The invfographic in our previous blog, 6 more studies prove Digital Marketing ROI was created with Piktochart.

MULTI-USE:

tableau data visualization

  • GOOGLE CHARTS: The seminal charting solution for much of the web, Google Charts is highly flexible and has an excellent set of developer tools behind it. It’s an especially useful tool for specialist visualizations such as geocharts and gauges, and it also includes built-in animation and user interaction controls.
  • NVD3: Is a library meant for reuse. The project takes all the power of D3 and distills them down into common chart types. I really like this idea because it gives you constrains and prevents you from running wild with different designs, while at the same time making the code much easier and more approachable if you are just getting started in data visualization.
  • TABLEAU: Places great emphasis on the ability to create visualizations without the need for any technical skills (scripting). and has a relatively easy to use interface. As with other products of this nature its utility is firmly anchored in visual exploration of data using every format imaginable. It is not a data mining tool or a text analytics tool, but sits in the traditional business intelligence camp, albeit with a rich visual interface.

BarnRaisers are big believers in the wisdom of Peter Drucker and practitioners in data visualization. Let us show you how we use them to better tell the s story of your business and achieve your goals.

Which of these 14 tools are of interest to you? Do they convince you of the power of data visualization? Do you want to use them better tell the story of your business?

  • About

    BarnRaisers is a full service digital marketing consultancy and agency. We build brands with ROI and proven relationship principles.



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