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12 inspiring digital marketing case studies prove ROI 1

Posted on April 30, 2018 by Rob Petersen

digital marketing case studies

Digital marketing case studies show how businesses and brands produce great results with the benefits of digital targeting, media selection and data analytics.

Here are a few reasons why companies are moving in this direction.

  • 86% of women turn to social networks before making a purchase (Alist daily)
  • 49% of organizations do not have a clearly defined digital marketing strategy (Smart Insights, Managing Digital Marketing research report)
  • 40% of marketers say proving the ROI of their marketing activities is their top marketing  challenge. (HubSpot, State of Inbound)

Here are examples of companies large and small, B2C and B2B to help spark great content, creative thinkingand execution at your organization, 12 inspiring digital marketing case studies that prove ROI.

  1. BRITISH TELECOM: Managed to save £2m per year by routing around 600,000 contacts per year through social media instead of its call centres. This also improved the customer experience, as these people preferred to deal with BT via social instead of phone or email.
  2. CLEAN & CLEAR: Used Snapchat to help raise awareness of its Morning Burst facial cleanser among females age 13 to 24. Clean & Clear partnered with Snapchat to run animated Snap Ads that reached the right people at the right time. Clean & Clear used Snapchat’s Lifestyle Categories to optimize its Snap Ads between Stories campaign and reach Snapchatters more likely to be interested in beauty. Clean & Clear’s Snap Ads and Filters campaign generated an 11.2% lift in Aided Awareness (5.5X higher than Millward Brown Norms) and a 7% lift in brand favorability (3.5X higher than Millward Brown Mobile Norms).
  3. CREME EGG: Switched ad spend from TV to Facebook in this example of digital marketing case studies. A seasonal social media campaign invited people to ‘Have a fling with Crème Egg’ on Facebook, created a long series of one-off posts that fed into an overall narrative across the three months. Facebook matched TV in driving brand consideration for a third of the cost increasing sales by 7% as a result.
  4. FISHER TANK: A welded steel tank constructed with a sales cycle of 12 months to several years. They used an Inbound Marketing approach would attract more (and more qualified) prospects to their website and give the company a chance to demonstrate how they think and what they do. They developed a more visually attractive site, and one that was a magnet for search engines. They included calls-to-action to download content of interest and value to prospects (primarily engineers, owners and facility and project managers) and integrated a blog with social sharing abilities, established company social media profiles, and optimized the site with the right long-tail keywords to get Fisher found in more searches. As a result, 1) website traffic increase by 119%, 2) quote request increased by 500% and 3) drove up the value of qualified sales opportunities by $3.4 million.
  5. HCC MEDICAL INSURANCE SERVICE: Infographics have been overused in recent years, but they’re still an effective medium for content marketing.HCC Medical Insurance Services (HCCMIS) managed to increase blog traffic and email revenue using an infographic aimed at its travel customers. Compared to its normal sales emails the infographic achieved a 96% lift in email revenue, while on Facebook the post that featured the graphic had more than 2,000 interactions compared to an average of 10.Overall HCCMIS’s blog post featuring the graphic achieved 3.9m views, of which 90% were new visitors.
  6. IBM: trained its sales people to use LinkedIn and Twitter, and also gave them access to a content calendar so they had relevant things to share. In this example of digital marketing case studies, the program resulted in 4x more sales year-on-year, though there are a few caveats to take into account.
  7. KLM: Noticed, from one of its employees, that a lot of people were asking about social payments, so they spoke to KLM’s IT and accounts teams to see if it was possible to set it up.This resulted in a new social payments tool, which cost €3,500 to setup and now takes €80,000 per week in sales.
  8. MANN FAMILY DENTAL: A comprehensive family care and cosmetic dentistry practice, wasn’t generating leads that would convert to patients. The creation of a blog on their website saw an immediate rise in phone calls. They used social media to strengthen and increase that organic referral web by engaging with their patients on Facebook. They focused on long tail keyword with local geographic terms. Mann Family Dental saw a: 1) 270% increase in web traffic 2) 10X increase in leads and a 3) 50% increase in patients generated from the website.
  9. NEUTROGENA: Used shopping basket data to identify competitor products loyal customers were already buying that were within their own range. Neutrogena knew they had a loyal base of customers, but 75% of shoppers were only buying items within a single segment of the Neutrogena range. They created a “product pairings” campaign delivered through video, banner ads and coupons to drive sampling. Consumers were targeted based on their personal buying habits. They saw an Increase in incremental sales with 18.1 million households reached and a  £5.84 return on advertising spend (ROAS).
  10. NILLA WAFERS: used Facebook to reinvigorate its Nilla Wafers brand and boost sales. A study showed Nilla Wafers sales increased 9% in test market locations among consumers who saw Facebook ads versus a control group of consumers over the course of a five-month campaign. The Facebook ad campaign for Nilla Wafers also was able to reach 11.3 million households through 190 million total impressions (16.8 impressions per household).
  11. SNICKERS: Targeting fat-fingered typists, this clever search campaign from Snickers used misspelled words in Google keywords to capture hungry office workers’ attention during the working day. The chocolate bar brand managed to reach 500,000 people within just three days of launch, without any seeding and for less cost than bidding on brand keywords.
  12. W HOLLYWOOD: Knew their luxury condominiums were expertly-crafted. Vibrant homes in the L.A. spotlight are eye-catching to many people. They created a lead-generation strategy which included SEO and Facebook ads to drive engaged visitors to the site. Google AdWords campaigns targeted specific areas within the California region and other cities where qualified lead potential was determined. The campaign resulted in: 1) 115% increase in conversions from Google Adwords, 2) 63% increase in site visits from SEO and 3) 1,800 goal completions from Facebook.

Do these digital marketing case studies inspire you? Did they prove ROI to your satisfaction? Could a creative digital marketing program help increase business in your organization?

50 compelling facts how online video boosts business 0

Posted on April 24, 2017 by Rob Petersen

online video

Online video now accounts for nearly 70% of consumer internet traffic.

With its rise, the conversation about online video has evolved from ways to create video content to how to get the most out of it?

To help answer this question, here are 50 compelling facts how online video boosts business.

  1. 98% of millennials watch videos on smartphones, compared to 56 percent on computers. (Animoto)
  2. Viewers retain 95% of a message when they watch it in a video compared to 10% when reading it in text. (Insivia)
  3. 93% of Twitter videos are watched on mobile. (Twitter)
  4. 92% of mobile viewers share online videos. (Animoto)
  5. 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visuals are processed 60,000X faster in the brain than text. (3M Corporation and Zabisco)
  6. 87% of online marketers use video content (Outbrain)
  7. 85% of Facebook video is watched without sound, (Digiday)
  8. 82% of Twitter users watch online video content on Twitter. (Bloomberg)
  9.  Including video in a landing page can increase conversion by 80% (EyeView).
  10. 80% Of Millennials use online videos when researching a purchasing decision. (Animoto)
  11. 80% of internet users who recall watching a video ad on a website they visited in the past 30 days. Of that 80%, 46% took some action after viewing the ad. In fact:
    • 26% looked for more information about the subject of the video
    • 22% visited the website named in the ad
    • 15% visited the company represented in the video ad
    • 12% purchased the specific product featured in the ad (Online Publishers Association)
  12. 77% of professional marketers and SMB owners are seeing results with video marketing. (Animoto)
  13. 75% of smartphone viewers watch a video to completion, while only 25% watch videos on desktop to completion. (Animoto)
  14. 75% of executives watch work-related videos on business websites at least once a week. (Forbes)
  15. 73% of B2B marketers say that video positively impacts marketing ROI. (Tubular Insights)
  16. 70% of marketers have found video produces more conversions than any other type of content. (Small Biz Trends)
  17. 65% of people who watch the first three seconds of a Facebook video will watch for at least 10 seconds, and 45% will watch for 30 seconds (Facebook)
  18. Video of a live event increases brand favorability by 63% (Twitter)
  19. 61% of young executive say they will rely more heavily on online video in the next 5-10 years (Cisco)
  20. 60% of marketers use videos in their social media marketing. (Social Media Examiner)
  21. 60% YouTube subscribers would follow advice on what to buy from their favorite creator over their favorite TV or movie personality (Google)
  22. 59% of executives agree that if both text and video are available on the same topic, they are more likely to choose video. (MWP)
  23. 55% of people consume videos thoroughly — the highest amount all types of content (HubSpot)
  24.  52% of marketing professionals worldwide name video as the type of content with the best ROI. (Syndacast)
  25. 52 percent of mobile traffic is a search for video. (Animoto)
  26. 54% of senior executives share work related videos with colleagues weekly (TubularInsights).
  27. More than 50% of videos are watched on mobile. (Ooyala)
  28. Almost 50% of internet users look for videos related to a product or service before visiting a store (ThinkWithGoogle).
  29. Marketers who use video grow revenue 49% faster than non-video users (VidYard).
  30. 48% of marketers plan to add YouTube to their content strategy in the next year (HubSpot).
  31. 48% of millennials view video solely on their mobile device. (Business of Apps)
  32. Almost half (46%) of viewers say they’ve actually made a purchase as a result of watching a branded video on social media and a third (32%) say they’ve considered making a purchase as a result of watching a video. (Animoto)
  33. 45% of internet users view at least one online video every month. (comScore)
  34. 45% of people watch more than an hour of Facebook or YouTube videos a week. (Wordstream)
  35. 43% of marketers said they’d create more video content if there were no obstacles like time, resources, and budget (Buffer).
  36. 43% of people want to see more video content from marketers in the future (HubSpot)
  37. Companies which use videos in their marketing enjoy 27% higher CTR and 34% higher web conversion rates than those which don’t. (Aberdeen Group)
  38. Using the word ‘video’ in an email subject line boosts the open rates by 19%. (Syndacast)
  39. U.S. online video ad spend projected to teach $17 billion by 2020. (eMarketer)
  40. Snapchatters watch 10 billion videos a day. (AdWeek)
  41. Periscope users have created more than 200 million broadcasts (Periscope)
  42. 1.8 million words. That’s the value of one minute of video, according to Dr. James McQuivey of Forrester Research.
  43. 50x easier to achieve a page 1 ranking on Google with a video (Forrester)
  44. More video content is uploaded in 30 days than the major U.S. television networks have created in 30 years. (Wordstream)
  45. Native videos on Facebook have 1oX higher reach compared to YouTube links. (Social Bakers)
  46. Videos are 6X more likely to be re-tweeted than photos and 3X more likely than GIFs (Twitter)
  47. 4x as many customer would rather watch a video about a product than read about it (Animoto).
  48. Blog posts incorporating video attract 3x as many inbound links as blog posts without video. (Moz)
  49. People spend on average 2.6x more time on pages with video than without (Wistia).
  50. Online shoppers who view demo videos are 1.81x more likely to purchase than non-viewers (DMB Adobe).

Hubspot created the infographic below to give you more guidance on online video and your business strategy.

To these facts help you see how online video can boost your business? Does your business need help with online video marketing?

online video

10 terrific traits of successful digital companies 2

Posted on February 12, 2017 by Rob Petersen

successful digital companies

Successful digital companies are organizations that use technology as a competitive advantage in its internal and external operations.

Many definitions abound but, in a nutshell, this is what makes them successful. Like any major achievement, success doesn’t occur unless the transformation changes the company culture as much as is does the company.

In this article, we study common characteristics. Here are 10 terrific traits of successful digital companies with examples.

  1. ARE UNREASONABLY ASPIRATIONS: Being “unreasonable” is a way to jar an organization into seeing digital as a business that creates value, not as a channel that drives activities. However the vision is described, if you aren’t making the majority of your company feel nervous, you probably aren’t aiming high enough. Burberry, in 2006, was a stalled business whose brand had become tarnished. A series of groundbreaking initiatives, including a website (ArtoftheTrench.Burberry.com) that featured customers as models, more robust e-commerce catalog that matched the company’s in-store inventory, and the digitization of retail stores through features such as radio-frequency identification tags leaped frog Burberry over competitors and tripled revenues.
  2. ARE CUSTOMER OBSESSED: Knowing what the customer wants has always been the key to successful digital companies. Advances in technology and data science make it possible to analyze the complete history of customer transactions and identify individual shopping habits, patterns and motives that drive behavior. 86% of consumers say they were willing to pay more for a better customer experience. And 89% begin doing business with a competitor following a poor customer experience. This mind-set is what enables companies to go beyond what’s normal and into the extraordinary. If online retailer Zappos is out of stock on a product, it will help you find the item from a competitor. While it might seem heretical to buy from competitors, it’s worth it for Zappos because 75% of its orders come from repeat customers.
  3. KNOW CUSTOMER LIFETIME VALUE (CLV): It is 6-7 times more expensive to acquire a new customer than it is to keep a current one. Successful digital companies recognize that, while customer acquisition is always important, there is often more to be gained be exploring ways to increase the Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) of current customers. According to a 2013 study by the Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, Amazon Prime members spend $1,340 annually. And that was 3 year ago. More important, Consumer Intelligence Research Partners estimates that Amazon Kindle owners spend approximately $1,233 per year buying stuff from Amazon, compared to $790 per year for other customers.
  4. ARE SOCIAL MEDIA ADEPT: If your company is customer obsessed, then you’re constantly listening to what your customers have to say about your brand, your competitor and your industry. Successful digital companies not only listen, they are adept at doing something with this data. McDonald’s decision to serve All Day Breakfast may have been a surprise to some customers, but shows how the massive company is trying to move nimbly and take some risks with its messaging. “Customers were saying to us ‘Hey, McDonald’s, this is the next big thing. This is what we want from you,'” said McDonald’s USA Chief Marketing Officer Deborah Wahl. With help from Twitter and Sprinklr, McDonald’s found 334,000 tweets mentioning All Day Breakfast at McDonald’s and found the most “engageable” accounts to send customized messages.
  5. ARE QUICK AND DATA-DRIVEN: Rapid decision making that is data-driven is critical in a dynamic digital environment. A cycle of continuous delivery, experimentation and improvement, adopting methods such as agile development and “live beta,” supported by big data analytics, are characteristics of successful digital companies. U.S. Xpress, a US transportation company, collects data in real time from tens of thousands of sources, including in-vehicle sensors and geospatial systems. Using Apache Hadoop, an open-source tool set for data analysis, and real-time business-intelligence tools, U.S. Xpress has been able to extract game-changing insights about its fleet operations. Data on the fuel consumption of idling vehicles led to changes that saved $20 million in fuel consumption in a year.
  6. PREPARE THEIR INFRASTRUCTURE: To take advantage of all that a digital world has to offer, successful digital companies have to be willing to invest in digital-ready infrastructures that will accelerate their digital strategies and the digital experiences of their customers, employees or citizens. As part of its three-year IT overhaul following a brush with bankruptcy, General Motors closed 23 of its data centers worldwide and moved most of that capacity into two new data center in Michigan. Reducing the distance for data to travel was a huge financial motivator for the company to not only saves on networking costs but improved responsiveness. New data centers are ‘private-cloud-meets-mainframe’ operations that run cloud-ready apps.
  7. KNOW THEIR METRICS: Metrics are a proxy for what matters most to senior management. But the measurements of success varies widely between marketing, tech management, and business unit leaders. This can creates conflict and confusion unless your company is clear about outcomes being measured. P&G created a single analytics portal, called the Decision Cockpit, which provides up-to-date sales data across brands, products, and regions to more than 50,000 employees globally. The portal, which emphasizes projections over historical data, lets teams quickly identify issues, such as declining market share, and take steps to address the problems in measurement the company considers critical to success.
  8. OPERATE IN A DIGITAL ECOSYSTEM: A digital ecosystem is the detailed visual of how all digital and social assets of a brand interconnect and interact. When managing multiple platforms, it’s important to understand how they will all work together to achieve the brand’s goal. Starbucks offers the largest and most robust mobile ecosystem of any retailer in the world, with more than 12 million Starbucks Rewards™ members (up 18% year on year), 8,000,000 mobile paying customers with one out of three now using Mobile Order & Pay, and more than $6 billion loaded onto prepaid Starbucks Cards in North America during the past year alone. Starbucks digital flywheel has also continued to gain momentum with the launch of true one-to-one personalization.
  9. PUT THE RIGHT LEADERS IN PLACE: The fast-moving digital world is exposing gaps in digital leadership, especially with regard to front office disciplines (those related to the customer experience) and head-office disciplines (those related to enterprise strategy). According to Gartner, three types of digital business leader have emerged to fill these leadership gaps: 1) Digital strategist, 2) digital marketing leader and 3) digital business unit leader. “A lot of our digital talent is home grown – mavericks who have their own businesses and have adapted their business in entrepreneurial ways. It is important to find these people and leverage their skills,” says David Crowley, Chief Commercial Officer, British Airways.
  10. SHOW ME THE MONEY: Many organizations focus their digital investments on customer-facing solutions. But they can extract just as much value, if not more, from investing in back-office functions that drive operational efficiencies. Successful digital companies know the value of reducing the costs of doing business. One-third of the digital innovation projects at Starbuck are devoted to improving efficiency and productivity away from the retail stores, and one-third focused on improving resilience and security. In manufacturing, P&G collaborated with the Los Alamos National Laboratory to create statistical methods to streamline processes and increase uptime at its factories, saving more than $1 billion a year.

Are these traits you associate with successful digital companies? Any there others you would add? Is your company interested in developing the capabilities of successful digital companies?

10 most inspiring digital marketing stories of 2016 4

Posted on December 18, 2016 by Rob Petersen

Digital marketing is an umbrella term for the marketing of products or services using a digital strategy, technologies and tactics that include search, paid advertising, social media and many other properties.

But channels and technologies don’t do justice to the ways some brands are putting it all together.

Here are the 10 most inspiring digital marketing stories of 2016.

  1. ALWAYS: Girls’ confidence takes a nosedive once they hit puberty, Always’ commercial launched an efforts to  help teach confidence to girls and young women through a variety of means. They’ve partnered with TED to create a series of educational videos on confidence that are shared with teachers and students worldwide, and even created the Always Confidence Curriculum, which was unveiled at the Always #LikeAGirl Confidence Summit. Meanwhile, the company continues to push out short, inspiring message via the hashtag #LikeAGirl.
  2. AMERICAN EXPRESS: Open Forum is a collaborative website, on which American Express invites guest authors from a variety of sectors to share their business knowledge and wisdom.  The result of this digital marketing is a content-rich mega-site that’s popular with the search engines – all created without American Express needing to shell out cash to content contributors.
  3. DACIAS: A subsidiary of Renault is one of Europe’s fastest growing car brands. Best known for their functional cars that offer amazing price-to-value ratios, the customer market grew by 60,000 cars in the last three years. By using Facebook’s boosted posts, Dacia placed ads related to their Sandero, Logan, and Stepway models. They focused on both desktop and mobile users. By incorporating data from past activity, the company ensured that a wide variety of ad testing was done, essentially optimizing the advertisement’s impact based on where their customers were in the buying cycle.
  4. DALLAS PETS ALIVE: Renamed shelter dogs after the most searched and trending topics to increase their chances of adoption — with pooches being named everything from Obamacare to Kim Kardashian’s Butt. The push was promoted by a funny online film and a Paid Search campaign. The digital marketing campaign grew traffic to its website by 98% and increased adoptions year-on-year by 200%.
  5. DOMINO’S: Really wants to make it easy to order pizza. The company let customers request delivery of their favorite pizza by tweeting to the @Dominos Twitter account, or by using the hashtag #EasyOrder. The tweet-based order system earned Domino’s media coverage from the likes of USA Today, Forbes, and Good Morning America, not to mention a Titanium Grand Prix award at Cannes. More than 50 percent of Domino’s orders come from digital marketing channels today.
  6. GIRL SCOUTS: Noticed that a lot of customers had issues with finding their nearest Girl Scout Representative when Cookie Season was in full swing. They wanted to drive cookie booth searches on their official website and also boost the number of downloads for their Girl Scout Cookie Finder mobile app. This would not only benefit the organization but also, be a massive help to consumers looking to buy cookies. @GirlScouts used an App Card (showcasing their delicious products) in a Twitter App Install campaign, which easily and conveniently allowed users to download and open the Girl Scout Cookie Finder app from their Twitter account. The result was 19,500+ Twitter-driven app installations.
  7. KRYLON: A spray-paint company, sent “DIY experts” to buy 127 “worthless” items along the route and transform them into something desirable, according to the company. After the yard sale ended, Krylon listed all of its transformed items for sale online, becoming the first brand to use Pinterest’s buyable pin feature. All of the proceeds (roughly $2,000) went to charity.As a result, Krylon’s Pinterest following increased by 4,400 percent, and the company estimates it gained $2.7 million in earned media on a $200,000 budget
  8. PWC: Has managed Oscar balloting for 82 years. For the 2016 awards ceremony, the company sought “to create a modern and savvy campaign” aimed at millennials by using Snapchat “to generate buzz internally and increase external visibility around the firm’s involvement with the Academy Awards,” according to the company. In its first two weeks, PwC’s Snap Story on Snapchat jumped to over 700 views. Within three weeks, the campaign received 1,062 related tweets on Twitter and 406 Instagram mentions.
  9. SPOTIFY: Created a very clever personalized video in December of 2015. They called it ‘A Year in Music, what did your 2015 sound like?’. This message was posted across the companies social channels, along with a generic video supporting that message. It then encouraged users to login to listen and watch their personal video, which was comprised of the users most played and favorite sounds of the year. The benefits for Spotify were that this built elements of customer loyalty, making users feel a little bit special – and it also made a lot of their users login when they may not have planned to previously.
  10. THE WIRECUTTER: Affiliate marketing can be a bit sleazy, but it can generate big results when done properly and genuinely. The Wirecutter has set the standard since its launch just five years ago. Labeling itself a simple “list of the best gadgets—like cameras and TVs—for people who don’t want to take a lot of time figuring out what to get,” the site generated $150 million in e-commerce transactions in 2015.

Do these make your list of best digital marketing stories this year? Are there any others you would add to the list? Do they inspire you to create a digital marketing story for your brand next year?

11 inspiring case studies of digital transformation 0

Posted on November 27, 2016 by Rob Petersen

digital transformation

  • 88% of companies report they are undergoing digital transformation (source: Altimeter Group)
  • 85% of enterprise decision makers say they have a time frame of two years to make significant inroads into digital transformation or they will suffer financially and fall behind their competitors (source: PWC)
  • 25% of companies have a clear understanding of new and underperforming digital touchpoints (source: Altimeter Group)

In other words, many companies report they are undergoing digital transformation even though most don’t know how to go about it.

Digital transformation is profound change in business activities, processes, competencies and models to fully leverage customers at every touchpoint in the customer experience.

Successful digital transformation achieve these results:

  • CUSTOMER: Harness customer networks and reinvent the path to purchase in line with their real behaviors
  • COMPETITION: Rethink the competition and build platforms that deliver competitive advantage
  • DATA: Turn data into assets that prove results in real time
  • INNOVATION: Innovate by rapid experimentation
  • VALUE: Judge change by how digital transformation helps create the next business

Since digital transformation doesn’t happen overnight, it also doesn’t hurt to show short term wins along the way.

Need some examples? Here are 11 inspiring case studies of digital transformation.

  1. AMAZON BUSINESS: Served as an example of ‘digital customer’ expectations transitioning to the B2B world. Features include: free two-day shipping on orders of $49 or more, exclusive price discounts, hundreds of millions of products, purchasing system integration, tax-exempt purchasing for qualified customers, shared payment methods, order approval workflows, and enhanced order reporting among others. Amazon Business launched in April 2015, with over 250 million products and a more holistic marketplace for B2B companies.
  2. AUDI: Changed the way in which companies sell vehicles, with the introduction of an innovative showroom concept launched in 2012 named Audi City. Audi City provided a unique brand experience and allows visitors to explore the entire catalogue of Audi’s model range hands-on in stores located in city centers, where large showrooms are not a possibility. At Audi City London sales went up 60% from the traditional Audi showroom that previously occupied the site. Moreover, they only stock four cars, reducing the cost of having to hold a large volume of stock that often does not match a customer’s criteria.
  3. FORD: Was structured, in early 2006, as a loose confederacy of regional business centers and IT silos. From 2006 on, they moved forward with clear goals: simplifying the company’s product line, focusing in on quantitative data and quality vehicles, and unifying the company as a whole. On the IT front, Ford slashed the budget by a massive 30 percent. Their goal, however, was not to reduce expenses, but to take resources that were tied up in maintaining fragmented and complex legacy systems and free them for use in expansion and innovation. It was all of these measures together that gave Ford the agility and capital to invest in ground-breaking projects such as the much-lauded Ford SYNC and MyFord Touch.
  4. GENERAL ELECTRIC: GE’s Digital Wind Farm is an adaptable wind energy ecosystem that pairs turbines with the digital infrastructure for the wind energy industry. GE’s previous solution, Wind PowerUp technology, had already been installed in 4,000 units, and improved turbine efficiency by up to 5%, which translates to up to a 20% improvement in profitability for each turbine; the new Digital Windfarm technology promised 20% efficiency improvements, which could help generate up to an estimated $50 billion of value for the energy industry.
  5. GLASSDOOR: Covered more than 450,000+ companies in over 190 countries and territories. More than 3,000 companies pay to use the company’s branding and recruiting tools (55,000+ free employer accounts). Glassdoor used its data for labor market research in the US; a portfolio of Fortune’s “Best Companies to Work For” companies outperformed the S&P 500 by 84.2%, while a similar portfolio of Glassdoor’s “Best Places to Work” outperformed the overall market by 115.6%.
  6. LEGO: After a period of expansion (1970-1991) LEGO suffered a steady decline (1992-2004) and by 2004 LEGO was close to bankruptcy. Reaching a tipping point, LEGO started restructuring and digital transformation focused on new revenue sources coming from movies, mobile games and mobile applications. LEGO achieved an EBITDA margin of 37.1% in 2014, an increase of 15% since 2007. In 2014, the first LEGO movie achieved revenues of approximately $468 million with a production budget of only $60 million.
  7. MCCORMICK & COMPANY: Launched FlavorPrint, an online flavor recommendation tool that visually represents consumer’s tastes. Consumers start with a 20 question quiz about eating habits and food likes and dislikes. FlavorPrint takes this data and generates personalized suggestions about recipes using algorithms. It has been dubbed “the Netflix for food” for its ability to suggest recipes based on individual’s tastes. FlavorPrint has been such a success that McCormick spun off into its own technology company called Vivanda
  8. MCDONALD’S: Recognized a massive shift in consumer behavior. For example, in 2015, McDonald’s began installing kiosks where customers can quickly customize their hamburgers. One of their more recent undertakings was for the 2015 Super Bowl football championship. McDonald’s used social media to give away products related to the commercials they aired throughout the game. It was important for McDonald’s to have the ability to respond immediately to consumers and actively monitor social media trends in real time. The effort was a success and drew over 1.2 million retweets including high-profile celebrities such as Taylor Swift.
  9. NETSPRESSO: Had the desire with its digital transformation to win new customers, gain a deeper understanding of its customers, and manage complex buying processes. But it was guided by the company’s clear goal: To provide customer’s with the perfect coffee experience. Netspresso’s initiatives are supported by a modern customer engagement solution based in the cloud, complete with network capability. Its cloud solution serves as an innovation platform with a full-fledged sales solution capable of handling the entire buying cycle: pricing, quotes, and orders. Nespresso’s digital initiatives have proven fruitful. Benefits include greater penetration into new markets, higher sales and user adoption, better sales productivity, and better visibility across the entire engagement cycle.
  10. STARBUCKS: COO Kevin Johnson perhaps sums it up best: “Where others are attempting to build a mobile app, Starbucks has built an end-to-end consumer platform anchored around loyalty.” The company’s main innovation is their Mobile Order and Pay app. This is fundamentally a customer-first strategy, as it addresses the basic wants of the consumer: convenience, line avoidance, and so forth. Coupled with their extensive loyalty program, the app gives Starbucks the perfect venue to up-sell and market to consumers. Furthermore, the app funnels back massive amounts of user data to the company, allowing them to better understand their customers’ habits and desires.
  11. UNDER ARMOUR: Wanted to become much more than an athletic apparel company when they introduced “connected fitness”— a platform to track, analyze and share personal health data right to customers’ phones. This new application provides a stream of information to UA that enables them to immediately identify fitness and health trends. For example, Under Armour, which is based in Baltimore, was able to immediately recognize a walking trend that started in Australia. This allowed them to deploy localized marketing and distribution efforts way before their competitors knew what was happening.

Does this help explain digital transformation to you? Do these case studies relate to your business? Does your business need help with a digital transformation roadmap?

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    BarnRaisers builds brands with proven relationship principles and ROI. We are a full service digital marketing agency. Our expertise is strategy, search and data-driven results.



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