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30 astonishing facts about Amazon customer loyalty 0

Posted on September 17, 2018 by Rob Petersen

amazon customer loyalty

The purpose of a business is to create and keep a customer. – Peter Drucker

Based on Peter Drucker’s wisdom, customer loyalty is one of a company’s most important assets. That goes for any company. Even, or especially, Amazon.

How loyal are Amazon’s customers? Here are 30 astonishing facts about Amazon customer loyalty.

  1. 95% of Prime members say they would “definitely” or “probably” renew their memberships.
  2. 94% of Survey Monkey’s audience say they’ve heard of Amazon Prime and 70% have used Amazon Prime.
  3. 95% of Amazon users always or sometimes read full product descriptions before purchasing.
  4. Almost 90% of Amazon customers say they would not consider purchasing a product with less than 3 stars.
  5. 85% of Prime shoppers visit Amazon at least once a week or more, that number drops to 56 percent for non-Prime members going to Amazon at least once a week.
  6. Nearly 80% of Amazon customers say they trust Amazon’s shipping more than packages shipped by a third-party seller to show Amazon customer loyalty.
  7. 75% of people who shop on Amazon use the Amazon search box.
  8. 69% of Whole Foods shoppers are Prime members to show Amazon customer loyalty with this acquistion.
  9. 65% of Amazon shoppers rank price as the most important factor, above faster shipping, free shipping and better product assortment.
  10. 63% of Amazon customers are Prime members to prove Amazon customer loyalty.
  11. 60% of Amazon customers say they wouldn’t consider purchasing items with less than a 4 ½ star rating.
  12. 59% of shoppers across 27 countries bought items on Amazon.com last year.
  13. 54% of people who buy on Amazon always read the full product description.
  14. 51% of Amazon customers come to the site to compare prices.
  15. 46% of Prime members say they buy on Amazon at least once a week.
  16. 44% of Amazon customers say they will always check prices on Amazon before purchasing on another site as a demonstration of their Amazon customer loyalty.
  17. 43% of all online sales come from Amazon.
  18. 43% say they would pay $10 or more for delivery within an hour while 32% would pay $10 or more for same-day shipping.
  19. 33% of Amazon users come to the site ready to buy
  20. 31% of Prime members go to amazon.com daily.
  21. 30% of Prime members said they ordered products weekly on Amazon in 2016, which grew to 46% in 2017.
  22. 24% of Amazon’s North American retail revenues can be attributed to consumers who first tried to buy an item at stores but found their local stores out-of-stock.
  23. 22% of Amazon users are now more likely to purchase their groceries via the giant marketplace, because of the Whole Foods acquisition, and 37% will consider it.
  24. 7.5% of Seattle’s working age population are Amazon employees.
  25. 13% of people who are not Prime member buy from Amazon weekly.
  26. 1.6 million packages are shipped every day from Amazon.
  27. 45,000 robots roam Amazon’s floors.
  28. #8 most reputable firm in U.S. and #18 in the world.
  29. Amazon is more valuable than all brick and mortar retailers combined.
  30. Amazon Prime offer discounts to everyone on government assistance.

Do these facts convince you of Amazon customer loyalty? Does your business need to improve its customer loyalty?

10 experts explain how to calculate ROI of an influencer 0

Posted on September 03, 2018 by Rob Petersen

 

influencer

Influencer is someone who helps other people buy from you. How do they do this? Influencers have a combination of three assets: Reach, contextual credibility and salesmanship.

How to determine if influencers are going to deliver a return on investment for your business?

Here’s how 10 experts calculate the ROI of influencers.

  1. UNIQUE CODE: If you sell products online and want to measure ROI of your influencer campaign by direct sales, give influencers a unique code to give to their audience that they can use at checkout for a percentage off their purchase. A good amount is 15%-20% off.  Calculate the amount of sales you earned from your influencer’s unique discount code and divide it by the dollars you spent on the campaign. – Kristen Matthews, Social Media Examin
  2. INFLUENCER LANDING PAGE: You must tie your influencer campaign into a branded landing page in order to measure the ROI of that influencer. The influencers can have as much free reign as you’ll permit, as long as they drive their audience where you want them to go. Once on the landing page, you, as the brand, can incentivize the users and capture their lead info for measurement data and future communication. – Kenny EicherThe CSI Group
  3. SOCIAL MEDIA AND WEBSITE ANALYTICS: One of the easiest metrics to track when using an influencer is social engagement. Track your social accounts for changes in total followers as well as new unfollows. Monitor your website traffic for an increase or decline in website visits from the social network. Are there spikes that align with the influencer’s activity? Do you see an increase in sales (or inquiries) directly following their activity? – Korena KeysKeyMedia Solutions
  4. HASHTAG CAMPAIGN: You could tailor your social media campaign to use a specific hashtag encourage influencers to use your hashtag with their followers. You can then tally uses of the hashtag, considering its use to be part of your influencer marketing campaign. – Influencer Marketing Hub
  5. KPI DEFINITION AND TRACKING:  Establish metrics for measuring the performance of your campaign. This means identifying your campaign objectives and metrics (KPIs) for tracking these objectives. The following KPIs are the most common for gauging influencer campaign success: 1) Engagement, 2) Reach/Impressions, 3) Follower growth and 4) Traffic. – Magda Houalla, Revfluence
  6. PIXEL TRACKING: TapInfluence partnered with a Fortune 500 Food Brand and Nielsen Catalina Solutions to complete the first ever Influencer Marketing Sales Effects Study. Special NCS tracking pixelautomatically inserted by software into blog content for every post. 1000 people viewing influencer contentgenerated $285 of incremental sales over the control group. Influencer Marketing delivered 11X ROI over all other forms of digital media. – Bill Carmody, CEO, Trepoint 
  7. CONVERSIONS: One of the simplest ways to do this on Instagram is to track direct conversions through the “comment to buy” feature. This allows consumers to comment directly on an influencer’s post expressing their interest in purchasing the product or products featured in the post. Consumers then receive a personalized link via email. Tracking “comment to buy” not only provides revenue information for the campaign, it’s also an excellent source of brand demographic information. – Andrew Higgins, Product Marketing and Product Management, Pixlee
  8. COMPARE VS OTHER INVESTMENTS: Be sure to track wherever possible: custom links, landing pages, influencer promo codes, giveaways, anything you can. Consider an influencer marketing campaign’s performance against your other marketing strategies. How much would you have to pay on Google PPC to gain the same exposure? Keep things in perspective and consider lifetime value. – Bernard MayNational Positions
  9. ENGAGEMENT: If your campaign focuses on social media exposure with influencers, look at engagement on your social channels after the influencer initiative. Do you have an increase in engagement on your channels? New followers are important, but it’s key to have the right followers. If your engagement increases, you know you reached your target audience who actually wants to engage with your content. – Lisa Arledge PowellMediaSource
  10. LIVE EVENT: A live experience is the ultimate influencer ecosystem. Getting like-minded people together who have a passion for a particular subject matter creates an environment for influencing, whether it be comics, cars or causes. Once at a live event, the social amplification through influencers is exponential and can be measured in real time through social posts, brand activation and word of mouth. – Chris CavanaughFreeman

Does the advice of these experts help you in calculating the ROI of influencers? Are you looking for help in how to effectively use influencers for your company?

33 facts on employee review sites for employers not to ignore 0

Posted on August 19, 2018 by Rob Petersen

employee review sites

Employee review sites provide employees the opportunity to rate their job and their company across a variety of measures, usually according according to a scale and/or percentage.

For the most part, employee review sites are used by potential job seekers to find objective, unbiased information about working at a particular company. What is its culture, leadership, chances for advancement, work-life balance and contributions the company is making to something significant.

Roughly 20 highly viewed websites are widely searched by potential employees. The top 5 are:

  1. Glassdoor
  2. Great Place to Work
  3. Indeed
  4. Comparably
  5. Careerbliss

If you’re looking for a job, you might want to check them out before applying to a company. The majority of job seekers read at least six reviews before forming an opinion of a company.

If you’re the employer, that’s just one fact about employees reviews sites to be aware. Here are 33 more facts about employee review sites not to ignore.

  1. 90% of job seekers find the employer perspective useful when learning about jobs and companies.
  2. 89% of Glassdoor users are either actively looking for jobs or would consider better opportunities.
  3. 84% of employees would consider leaving their current jobs if offered another role with a company that had an excellent corporate reputation. And most in $75-100K salary range would only require a 1-10% salary increase to consider such a move.
  4. 84% of companies believe a clearly defined strategy is key to achieving employer branding objectives.
  5. 80% of Millennials look for people and culture fit with employers, followed by career potential.
  6. 79% are likely to use social media in their job search.
  7. 78% of sales professionals said they would accept less money to work at a company selling something compelling.
  8. 76% of job applicants want details on what makes the company an attractive place to work.
  9. 70% of Millennials say they hear about companies through friends and job boards.
  10. 69% of people would not take a job with a company that had a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed.
  11. 69% is the average CEO approval rating on Glassdoor.
  12. 67% of active and passive job seekers say that when they’re evaluating companies and job offers, it is important to them that the company has a diverse workforce.
  13. 66% of healthcare professionals are likely to accept less money to work at a company with a great culture.
  14. 65% of Millennials said that they are more skeptical of claims made by employers now than they were in 2011.
  15. 64% of Millennials would rather make $40K a year at a job they love, than $100K a year at a job they think is boring.
  16. 62% of employees agree perception of a company improves after seeing an employer respond to a review on employee review sites.
  17. 61% of Glassdoor users report that they seek company reviews and ratings on employee review sites before making a decision to apply for a job.
  18. 60% of Millennials consider the most attractive perk to be growth opportunities.
  19. 57% of Glassdoor visitors are employed either full-time or part-time.
  20. 57% of people think their company should be doing more to increase diversity among its workforce.
  21. 54% read company reviews on employee review sites from their mobile devices.
  22. 51% of employees are considering a new job.
  23. 49% of employees would recommend their employer to a friend.
  24. 48% of female software engineers are likely to apply to a company a friend recommended.
  25. 46% of Glassdoor members are reading reviews when they have just started their job search and have not yet spoken with a company recruiting or hiring manager.
  26. 46% of Millennials left their last job due to lack of career growth.
  27. 45% of job seekers say they use their mobile device specifically to search for jobs at least once a day.
  28. 39% of employees have shared praise or positive comments online about their employer on employee review sites.
  29. Only 33% of employers encourage employees to use social media to share news and information about their work or employer.
  30. Only 26% of employees agree “my employer listens and responds well to me.”
  31. Only 17% of employees highly rate communications from their company’s top leader and senior leadership.
  32. On average, each corporate job opening attracts 250 resumes. Of these candidates, four to six will be called for an interview and only one will be offered the job.
  33. Employees rank as the most trusted influencers when communicating about their company’s engagement and integrity.

Do you think your company should know the influence of employee review site. Does this convince you of the impact reviews have?

6 segmentation case studies open up new revenues for brands 0

Posted on August 13, 2018 by Rob Petersen

segmentation

Segmentation is the process of defining and subdividing a large homogenous market into clearly identifiable segments having similar needs, wants, or demand characteristics.

The importance of segmentation is that it allows a business to precisely reach a consumer with specific needs and wants. This enables the company to use resources more effectively, make better strategic marketing decisions and realize new revenue streams.

Four basic factors are required for effective market segmentation. They are:

  1. Clear identification of the segment
  2. Measurement of its effective size
  3. Accessibility through marketing efforts
  4. Dedication of company resources

Whose done it well? Here are 6 segmentation case studies that opened up new revenues for brands.

  1. BUSTEDTEES: Ecommerce retailer BustedTees has a global customer base. It used to send all of its emails at the same time of day. The company segmented its email list by time zone then set its campaigns to be delivered at 10 am local time. BustedTees added an extra layer of segmentation using past data on individual open times to develop a personalized send time for each subscriber. The results were:
    • 8% lift in email revenue overnight from personalised send time.
    • 17% increase in total email response rate.
    • 11% higher clickthrough rate.
    • 7.6% increase in post-click site engagement.
  2. CANON: The quick rise of Smartphone cameras was eclipsing the development of the digital camera market. The kids segment was an under-developed market. Canon was trying to extend its target segment from parents-to-be to parents with kids, targeting mainly 5-9 years old and their parents. Dubbed Kidictionary, a three months contest asked participants to interoperate an ordinary word in a creative way through photography, and then to share online and social media. In order to drive better engagement, the company planted the seed via key opinion bloggers and online advertising to draw eyeballs. The campaign website pulled in 3,559 (64.3% ) new visitors and 1,976 (35.7%) returning visitors. In total, the site recorded 5,535 visitors per month and over 180 visitors per day. Total submission on the “Kidictionary” reached 344 and 348 users.The campaign gained 40% market share on low-end DC compared to last year.
  3. DOGGYLOOT: Flash sale site Doggyloot segments and personalises its emails based on the type of dog that its customers own, so people with big dogs get different emails to those who own a terrier. In order to collect this information the company offered incentives to its existing email list if they shared their dog’s size and birthday. The campaigns segmented into three groups based on dog size, and yielded results:
    • Open rate up 10.2%.
    • Clickthrough rate is 410% higher than average.
    • Contributes up to 13% of daily total revenue.
  4. JOHNNY CUPCAKES: Clothing retailer Johnny Cupcakes had an email list of 80,000 customers. However, the data was incomplete and everyone received the same marketing messages. In order to make its emails more effective, Johnny Cupcakes initially used vendor software to mine additional information from its customers’ social profiles. It was then able to find out data on gender, customer interests, brand preferences and media habits. For the first time the business could run a product launch campaign with separate emails for men and women who had expressed an interest in baseball. This fairly simple segmentation resulted in:
    • 42% increase in clickthrough rates.
    • 123% increase in conversion rate.
    • 141% increase in revenue per campaign.
  5. LEGO: By carefully targeting its intended audiences and using the social media platforms where these consumers actively participate, the Lego Group was able to effectively reach its customers and offer them the kind of online experience. The company used six distinct personas to categorize their customers based on purchase and usage rates: These six personas ranged from consumers who were highly involved with the Lego Group’s products, such as those who helped shape product design to those having no experience with the brand. By actively engaging these people and giving them special attention, the Lego Group stood the best chance of encouraging them to be the company’s most ardent advocates. The Lego Group became the world’s fourth largest toy manufacturer, capturing approximately 6.9% of the global market share of toy sales and continues to sustain a high growth rate, as well as showing a net profit of about $688 million dollars for the year.
  6. ROYAL CANADIAN MINT: By identifying key characteristics of high-value new and existing customers, the Mint wanted to create custom models to develop effective up-sell and cross-sell strategies throughout the consumer lifecycle. By turning to PRIZM and TKTK the Mint was able to score the best unaddressed admail segments as having the highest concentrations of those prospects and top performing segments. These same insights also helped the mint develop messages that would resonate with those consumers. The data analytics helped the Mint add 140,000 new customers in a single campaign. The Mint was able to identify 15 percent more prospects for major coin purchases—and predicted higher revenues over the next year.

To these case studies convince you of the effectiveness of market segmentation? Is your brand ready to realize new revenue streams through segmentation?

12 content marketing case studies from big brands that win big 0

Posted on August 05, 2018 by Rob Petersen

content marketing case studies

Content marketing case studies for big brands show just how effective and accepted content marketing now is.

Did you know Coca-Cola, for example, spends more money on content creation than it does on television advertising?

Content marketing generates 3X more leads than traditional, outbound marketing but costs 62% less. And conversion rates from content marketing are 6X higher than other methods.

Why are more and more big brands investing in content marketing? What are they doing? How is it working?

Here are 12 content marketing case studies from big brands that win big.

  1. ADIDAS: In 2016, the company launched GamePlan A, a digital magazine uniquely developed to build company culture and attract and retain employees. The new strategy is already seeing strong results. Back then, there were around 10,000 employees in the Adidas LinkedIn community – which happens to be GamePlan A’s most important distribution channel. Today, that number has grown to more than 33,000, along with 673,000 general followers.
  2. BEN & JERRY’S: When it comes to companies that lead with their values, Ben & Jerry’s has long been at the forefront. It’s not afraid to take a stance on pressing political issues, including racial justicerefugeesclimate changevoting rights, and LGBT equality. Its content hub reflects the company’s commitment. Amid posts about ice cream recipes and new flavors, there are regular stories that align with Ben & Jerry’s values, like “10 Things Trump Gets Wrong About Refugees,” “QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Climate Change?” and “7 Ways We Know Systemic Racism Is Real.”  Ben & Jerry’s business has tripled in the last 15 years. Unilever, which owns Ben & Jerry’s, reported the ice cream maker grew at double-digit rates for this effort
  3. CLEVELAND CLINIC: Health Essentials, Cleveland Clinic’s consumer-facing site, publishes two to three posts a day and has received more than 45 million visits, to date. Consult QD is a site for a smaller niche of physicians and publishes three to five posts per day. Both sites distribute content via email newsletters and social media channels.
  4. EQUINOX: Furthermore is more than a blog among content marketing case studies. It’s an editorial destination. Run by a team of Condé Nast veterans, the site is an extension of the Equinox brand and features show-stopping photography and design with a range of high-quality writing, videos, and even musical playlists that are published online. The curated and mostly user-generated Furthermore Instagram feed attracts more than 50,000 engaged followers (and several hundred likes per post). With nearly 88,000 subscribers on YouTube, it’s video that’s a clear win for the brand.
  5. GOLDMAN SACHS: With its own in-house studio, Goldman Sachs takes the value of content marketing seriously. Its thought leadership hub, Our Thinking, features various content formats from a podcast (“Exchanges at Goldman Sachs“), to videos (“Talks at GS”), to interactive infographics and articles. Goldman Sachs reaped the benefits of strong evergreen content when one of its older series received more than 1 million views after a mention on Reddit.As for social media, Goldman Sachs is a content marketing case studies powerhouse, sharing lots of video content on Twitter to its 660,000 followers, and racking up more than 23.7 million views on YouTube.
  6. IKEA: IKEA made a foray into the AMSR world with a 25-minute video that showed a woman decorating a dorm room with IKEA products. The video has been viewed more than 1.4 million times on YouTube. IKEA has an energetic community of social media followers, including more than 495,000 who create and follow IKEA inspiration boards on Pinterest, and 1.4 million on Instagram who regularly engage.
  7. KIMKIM: A travel planning service, partnered with local guides that create useful insights and information with the objective of giving their users the best experience. kimkim built their rankings through targeted keywords, they also used digital PR to build their link portfolio, and they created high-quality relevant content on their blog to attract the target audience who often search in Google. They increased organic traffic by 300% – and grew their revenue.
  8. LAND ROVER:  The Land Rover Stories section of their website features travelogues in which photographers document their experiences riding a specific Land Rover model through rugged and picturesque landscapes, like Montana, the Colorado mountains, and Alaska. Each story includes large, stunning visuals. Land Rover’s content strategy also extends to social media and video. Last fall, Land Rover created a video series in which it followed an adventurer couple and their eight-week-old baby taking a two-week trip across Europe in a Land Rover Discovery. Land Rover’s YouTube account has 138,000 subscribers. On Instagram, it promotes its stories and has 3.5 million fans, thousands of whom engage with every post.
  9. LENOVA: To execute its content marketing strategy, Lenovo, one of the largest manufacturers of desktop, computer hardware, developed a digital content hub called Tech Revolution to deliver technical news and technology information to IT decision makers across Asia Pacific region. They were able to successfully engage with their target audience through this content marketing hub. The leads generated via Tech Revolution, were routed to their website, based on which sales executives were able to readily connect with consumers. The digital content hub had more than 250 articles with 34 million impressions, 308 link clicks, and was visited by 1,70,000 new web users.In terms of financials, $300 million in sales was attributable to this initiative alone.
  10. SEPHORA: f you seek a great example among content marketing case studies of user-generated content marketing, look no further than Sephora. Rather than having employees run a beauty blog, Sephora lets customers do the talking. Its content hub is its community of enthusiasts and loyalists, who discuss products and share recommendations, tips, and advice on what’s worth buying.
  11. TRIP ADVISOR: TripAdvisor has used social media and SEO to position itself as the best travel website and the best valuable resource for travelers. But the exceptional thing about TripAdvisor is their user generated content for reviews.Aside from the SEO signal it creates, it also creates more engagements and makes a lot of sense having people with a first-hand travel experience share their reviews.
  12. VISIT SEATTLE: Visit Seattle teamed up with CBS to launch “The Emerald Race.” Past “Amazing Race” contestants embarked on similar challenges in and around Seattle, taking in the city’s sights and outdoor experiences, and meeting notable locals along the way. In October, Visit Seattle launched “Turning Tables,” a series that paired local musicians and chefs to create unique music and dining experiences. The result of these videos: more than 22 million YouTube views. Even more importantly, they’re helping Visit Seattle reach its target demographic of 25- to 44-year-olds.

Do this content marketing case studies convince you of the effectiveness and acceptance of content marketing? Does your brand have a plan for content marketing?

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