47 facts about Christmas that will surprise you 0

Posted on December 21, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

BarnRaisers ChristmasHappy Holidays from all of us at BarnRaisers. May the New Year unfold everything you hope it does.

The Christmas Spirit is about expressing extra tolerance, charitableness and giving, especially to those who have had a difficult year or are going through trying times. And to be focused on a bright future.

Perhaps, by learning a little more about Christmas, it will give us an appreciation to express this spirit now and in the New Year.

Here are 47 facts about Christmas to bring out the Christmas Spirit.

    1. The Bible doesn’t mention when Jesus was actually born. Most historians believe it was the Spring because of shepherds herding animals.
    2. December 25 was probably chosen because it coincided with the ancient pagan festival Saturnalia, which celebrated the agricultural god Saturn with partying, gambling, and gift-giving.
    3. On Christmas Eve during World War I, Allied troops took a break from fighting to sing Christmas Carols. When German soldier emerged they all shook hands exchanging greetings and cigarettes. It was called the Christmas Truce of 1914.
    4. Every year since 1947, the people of Oslo, Norway have given a Christmas tree to the city of Westminster, England. The gift is an expression of good will and gratitude for Britain’s help to Norway during World War II.
    5. Since 1971, the Province of Nova Scotia has presented the Boston Christmas tree to the people of Boston, in gratitude for the relief supplies received from the citizens of Boston after a ship exploded in 1917 following a collision in the Halifax, Nova Scotia Harbor. Part of the city was leveled, killing and injuring thousands.
    6. Because of its roots in pagan festivals, Christmas was not immediately accepted by the religious. In fact, from 1659 to 1681, it was illegal to celebrate Christmas in Boston. You were fined if you were caught celebrating.
    7. Christmas in early America was inconsequential. After the Revolutionary War, Congress didn’t even bother taking the day off to celebrate the holiday, deciding instead to hold its first session on Christmas Day, 1789.
    8. In 1856 Franklin Pierce, the 14th President of the United States, was the first President to place a Christmas tree in the White House.
    9. Teddy Roosevelt banned the Christmas tree from the White House for environmental reasons.
    10. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer got his start as an advertising gimmick. A copywriter named Robert L. May first created the merry misfit in 1939 to lure shoppers into the Montgomery Ward department store.
    11. Rudolph almost didn’t have a red nose either: At the time, a red nose was a sign of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward thought he would look like a drunkard.
    12. Though Santa Claus has worn blue and white and green in the past, his traditional red suit came from a 1930s ad by Coca Cola.
    13. Frosty the Snowman was made famous by a whiskeymaker in 1890 who used Frosty’s likeness to showcase an entirely different kind of holiday cheer. Once Prohibition ended, Frosty quickly became the go-to guy for alcohol ads, appearing in posters for Miller beer, Jack Daniel’s, Ballantine ale, Rheingold beer, Schlitz beer, Schenley, Oretel’s lager beer, Chivas Regal scotch, Fort Pitt pale ale, Mount Whitney beer and Four Roses.
    14. Mistletoe is magical according to Celtic legend. It can heal wounds, increase fertility, bring good luck and ward off evil spirits.
    15. The tradition of kissing under the mistletoe began the Victorian era, surprising (or maybe not) considering the stuffy and sexually repressive behavior of the time.
    16. The use of evergreen trees to celebrate the winter season occurred before the birth of Christ.
    17. Germans decorated evergreen trees to brighten the dark, gloomy days of the winter solstice. The first “Christmas trees” appeared in Strasbourg in the 17th century and spread to Pennsylvania in the 1820s with the arrival of German immigrants.
    18. The Germans made the first artificial Christmas trees out of dyed goose feathers.
    19. Approximately 30-35 million real (living) Christmas trees are sold each year in the U.S.
    20. 98 percent of all Christmas trees are grown on farms, while only 2% are cut from the wild.
    21. Most Christmas trees are cut weeks before they get to a retail outlet. It is important to keep them watered thoroughly when they reach your home. In the first week, a Christmas tree in your home will consume as much as a quart of water per day.
    22. The earliest known Christmas tree decorations were apples. At Christmastime, medieval actors would use apples to decorate paradise trees (usually fir trees) during “Paradise Plays,” which were plays depicting Adam and Eve’s creation and fall.
    23. Thomas Edison’s assistant, Edward Johnson, came up with the idea of electric lights for Christmas trees in 1882. Christmas tree lights were first mass-produced in 1890.
    24. In Finland, Finns visit saunas on Christmas Eve.
    25. In Portugal, Portuguese revelers hold a feast on Christmas Day for the living and the dead (extra places are set for the souls of the deceased).
    26. In Greece, some believe that goblins called kallikantzeri run wild during the 12 days of Christmas, and most Greeks don’t exchange presents until Jan. 1, St. Basil’s Day.
    27. In Australia and New Zealand, most Australians and New Zealanders enjoy Christmas on the beach or at barbecues.
    28. In Spain, the Spanish hold the World’s Largest Lottery on Christmas Day. It is called “El Gordo” or “The Fat One.”
    29. Each year more than 3 billion Christmas cards are sent in the U.S. alone.
    30. In Poland, spiders or spider webs are common Christmas trees decorations because according to legend, a spider wove a blanket for Baby Jesus. In fact, Polish people consider spiders to be symbols of goodness and prosperity at Christmas.
    31. Alabama was the first state in the United States to officially recognize Christmas in 1836.
    32. Christmas wasn’t declared an official holiday in the United States until June 26, 1870.
    33. Oklahoma was the last U.S. state to declare Christmas a legal holiday, in 1907.
    34. The poinsettia is native to Mexico and was cultivated by the Aztecs, who called the plant Cuetlaxochitl (“flower which wilts”). For the Aztecs, the plant’s brilliant red color symbolized purity, and they often used it medicinally to reduce fever.
    35. Contrary to popular belief, the poinsettia is not poisonous, but holly berries are.
    36. Santa Claus is based on a real person, St. Nikolas of Myra (also known as Nikolaos the Wonderworker, Bishop Saint Nicholas of Smyrna, and Nikolaos of Bari), who lived during the fourth century. Born in Patara (in modern-day Turkey), he is the world’s most popular non-Biblical saint, and artists have portrayed him more often than any other saint except Mary.
    37. Santa Claus is based on a real person, St. Nikolas of Myra (also known as Nikolaos the Wonderworker, Bishop Saint Nicholas of Smyrna, and Nikolaos of Bari), who lived during the fourth century. Born in Patara (in modern-day Turkey), he is the world’s most popular non-Biblical saint, and artists have portrayed him more often than any other saint except Mary.
    38. There are two competing claims as to which president was the first to place a Christmas tree in the White House. Some scholars say President Franklin Pierce did in 1856; others say President Benjamin Harrison brought in the first tree in 1889.
    39. President Coolidge started the White House lighting ceremony in 1923.
    40. President Teddy Roosevelt, an environmentalist, banned Christmas trees from the White House in 1912.
    41. There are approximately 21,000 Christmas tree farms in the United States. In 2008, nearly 45 million Christmas trees were planted, adding to the existing 400 million trees.
    42. Christmas is a contraction of “Christ’s Mass,” which is derived from the Old English Cristes mæsse (first recorded in 1038).
    43. The letter “X” in Greek is the first letter of Christ, and “Xmas” has been used as an abbreviation for Christmas since the mid 1500s.
    44. The first person to decorate a Christmas tree was reportedly the Protestant reformer Martin Luther (1483-1546). According to legend, he was so moved by the beauty of the stars shining between the branches of a fir tree, he brought home an evergreen tree and decorated it with candles to share the image with his children.
    45. Christmas purchases account for 1/6 of all retail sales in the U.S.
    46. he first batch of eggnog in America was crafted at Captain John Smith’s Jameston settlement in 1607, and the name eggnog comes from the word “grog,” which refers to any drink made with rum.
    47. “Jingle Bells” was originally supposed to be a Thanksgiving song.

These facts were curated from articles by Time,  Random History, Entertainment Tonight and University of Illinois Extension, with gratitude and appreciation for helping me gain a deeper understanding of Christmas and the Christmas Spirit.

Did they do the same for you?

37 facts on the future of social selling vs. cold calling 0

Posted on December 14, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

 

social selling vs. cold calling

50% of sales go the first salesperson to contact a prospect (source: InsidesSales.com).

Social Selling is the use of social media to interact directly with prospects, answer questions and offer thoughtful content until the prospect is ready to buy. Social selling is not hard selling. In fact, it’s the opposite.

Cold Calling is the solicitation of business from potential customers who have had no prior contact with the salesperson conducting the call. 

You might say one is yesterday’s way of selling and the other is today’s.

  • Where is it going in the future?
  • Why has it changed?
  • Which means is most likely to get to the prospect first?

Here are 37 facts on the future of social selling vs. cold calling.

SOCIAL SELLING

  1. 98% of sales reps with 5000+ LinkedIn connections achieve quota (source: Sales Benchmark Index)
  2. 89% of customers begin their buying process with a search engine (source: Fleishman-Hillard)
  3. 80% of introductions generate a sale (source: DSWA)
  4. 75% of customers say they use social media as part of the buying process (source: IBM)
  5. 74% of B2B marketing companies use Twitter to distribute content (source: Content Marketing Institute)
  6. 72.6% of salespeople using social media outperformed their sales peers (source: Social Media and Sales Quota Survey)
  7. 61% of US marketers use social media for lead generation (source: IBM)
  8. 55% of B2B buyers search for information on social media (source: MediaBistro)
  9. 54% who used social media tracked their social media usage back to at least one closed deal. (source: Social Media and Sales Quota Survey)
  10. 50.1% of sales people who report using social media state that they spend less than 10% of their selling time using social media (source: Social Media and Sales Quota Survey)
  11. 50% of identified sales leads are not ready to buy (source: Gleanster)
  12. 47% larger purchases result from nurtured leads than non-nurtured leads (source: The Annuitas Group)
  13. 42% Follow or Like a friend or brand; 79% are motivated to do this in order to learn more about the brand (source: Fleishman-Hillard)
  14. Over 40% of salespeople say they’ve closed between two and five deals as a result of social media. (source: Social Media and Sales Quota Survey)
  15. Social media users were 23% more successful than their non-social media peers. (source: Social Media and Sales Quota Survey)
  16. Today’s sales process takes 22% longer than 5 years ago (source: SiriusDecisions)
  17. You are almost 5X more likely to schedule a first meeting if you have a personal LinkedIn connection (source: Sales Benchmark Series)
  18. Marketers spend an average of 4-6 hours a week on social media (source: Social Media Examiner)
  19. 2X higher ROI from email marketing than cold calling, networking or trade shows (source: MarketingSherpa)
  20. B2B marketers who use Twitter generate 2X as many leads as those that do not (source: Inside View)

COLD CALLING

  1. 91% of the time, cold calling doesn’t work (source: Harvard Business Review)
  2. 91% of customer say they’d give referrals; only 11% of salespeople ask for referrals (source: Dale Carnegie)
  3. 90% of C-suite executive say they never respond to cold calls or email blasts (source: Harvard Business Review)
  4. 82% of B2B decision makers think sales reps are unprepared (source: SiriusDecisions)
  5. Customers don’t want to deal with salespeople until they are 70% down the path of the buying process (source: HubSpot)
  6. 61% of marketers send leads directly to sales, despite the fact that only 27% of those leads are qualified (source: SalesForcce.com)
  7. 60% more expensive per lead than other methods (source: HubSpot)
  8. 57% of the buying process is done before sales contact (source: Corporate Executive Board)
  9. 8 attempts to reach a prospect today with a cold call vs. 3.68 in 200y (source: TeleNet and Ovation Sales Group)
  10. 8% of salespeople get 80% of sales (source: The Marketing Donut)
  11. 7 people in the average firm of 100-500 people are involved in a buying decision (source: Gartner)
  12. Only 5$ of business lead phone calls lead to a sale (source: DSWA)
  13. Only 2% of cold calls result in an appointment (source: Leap Job)
  14. Only 2% of sales occur at a first meeting (source: The Marketing Donut)
  15. Only 2 attempts are made by the average salesperson do reach a prospect (source: Sirius Decisions)
  16. 1 out of 250 salespeople exceed their targets (source: Harvard Business Review)
  17. Less than 1% of cold calls lead to a sale (source: DSWA)

These facts say we spend more time on search engines and social networks seeking out, researching and connecting with products we’re going to buy and the people who we want do to do business than we do on our phones. As a result, more of us believe we don’t need to speak to a salesperson until we are further along in the buying process.

When that time comes to speak to someone, the person who is most relevant and top of mind is more likely to be the contact that gets the business. And it’s more likely that person is going to be found through an association established on the internet and social media than it is a cold call.

And that’s now. So the trend is only going to move more in that direction for the future.

Do these give you facts for the future on social selling vs. cold calling? Could your business use help doing social selling better?

Top 7 free social media measurement tools from 7 experts 1

Posted on December 09, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

social media measurement tools

  • 90% of CMOs say social data has impacted at least some of their decisions; only 47% use data to make predictions or forecast sales. (source: Bazaarvoice)
  • 87% of marketers want to know how to measure their return on investment for social media activities (source: Social Media Examiner)
  • 85% use social networks in some way; only 14% tie financial metrics to it (source: AdAge)

These facts indicate most companies use social media but don’t measure it. Yet, virtually all agree they would make better business decisions, possibly determine their return of investment, if they did.

Social media measurement is the use of tools to monitor what is being said on the internet. It also is called Social Listening, Online Analytics, Buzz Analysis, Social Media Measurement, Social Media Intelligence.

Admittedly, it’s a hard area to get your hands around. There are hundreds of social media measurement tools. Costs range from free to upwards of $20,000/year and, as with any tool, they have specific strengths and weaknesses.

What to do? You’ll never know until you get started. The risk of doing nothing may be greater

To help you get going, here are the Top 7 free social media measurement tools from 7 experts.

  • GOOGLE ANALYTICS: Has Social Visitors Flow. It is a visual presentation of how visitors from social properties are navigating your website. Assuming the goal of your social media campaign is to get more traffic to your website, this report quickly gives you insight into which social platforms are sending the most traffic to your site and what your social visitors are doing once they get there. – Lisa Peyton, Social Media Examiner

google analytics socail media measurement tool

  • HOOTSUITE: Is one of the best free social media management tools available, and covers multiple social networks, including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, WordPress, Foursquare and Google+. The weekly analytics reports and the excellent team management facility (delegating tasks, sending private messages) can be very useful when there’s more than one person handling the social media accounts. – Ruxandra Mindruta, Brandwatch

hootsuite social media measurement tool

 

  • MARKETING GRADER: Has been modified over the past few years to focus on your social media presence. Scoring low in these areas is a far greater problem than say, not having alternate text tags for your images. Marketing Grader makes recommendations on how to perform better keyword searches and to ‘power up’ your site’s engine. – Nader Mahmoudi, Business2Community

website grader social media measurement tool

  • SOCIAL MENTION: Is a social media search engine that searches for keywords on social media platforms — including blogs, comments, bookmarks, events, news, videos and microblogging services — and provides metrics around keywords and “sentiment.” It also provides graphic illustrations or charts showing mentions per day or week. - JD Lasica, Socialbrite

social mention social media measurement tool

  • SOCIAL SEARCHER: Is a social search engine with strong social analytics and excellent dashboards for a free tool. Enter a brand, topic or keyword and the analytics display mentions by social networks. They also have sentiment analysis. There are pie-charts showing type of posts (e.g. status, link, video) for social networks . The dashboards look good for presentation purposes too. – Rob Petersen, BarnRaisers

social searcher social media measurement tool

  • SPROUT SOCIAL: Is the perfect social monitoring tool for small-to-medium sized franchises, local businesses with a handful of locations and smaller companies on a limited budget. I can imagine restaurants monitoring their reviews and tips on Foursquare using Sprout Social. The integration of Klout scores of authors also helps brands to identify influential mentions. I highly recommend Sprout Social for business owners. – Diedre Drewess, DragonSearch

sprout social social media measureent tool

  • TOPSY: One part virality tool, one part tracking mechanism, one part social listening post, Topsy is becoming one of new favorites. I’ve moved from Tweetmeme to Topsy on my embedded tweeting, due to improved metrics, and Topsy’s competitive intelligence capabilities are impressive. Find a tweet your competitor sent, and see how many times it was retweeted, by whom, which among them are influencers. – Jay Baer, Convince and Convert

topsy social media measurement tool

These tools are also mostly intuitive to use.

If your business is in social media, what do you do to measure it? If you don’t, do these social medial measurement tool help you get going?

 

 

14 best data visualization tools for better storytelling 2

Posted on November 30, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

Peter Drucker

If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it. – Peter Drucker

This succinct truth says you can’t know whether you are reaching your goal unless success is defined and tracked. Data visualization is technology that lets corporate executives and other end users see data to better understand information in context.

Hundreds of tools are now available to chart, create dashboards and better measure and mange data. They range in price from open source to thousands of dollars per year. They range is sophistication from “drag and drop,” plug-ins and widgets to java script that is likely to involve a web developer.

The growth of data visualization says a mix of data and narrative is now a better way for businesses to tell their story.

Which tools are best to tell your story? While price and software sophistication play a role, the more important criteria are:

  • How you define success?
  • What measures are most important to manage?

Once you’ve answered these questions, here are 14  of the best data visualization tools. They are grouped by categories to help you be a better storyteller with data.

PIE, LINE AND BAR CHARTS

zingchart data visualization

  • DYGRAPHS: is a fast, flexible open source JavaScript charting library. Dygraphs creates chart that are interactive: you can mouse over to highlight individual values. You can click and drag to zoom. Double-clicking will zoom you back out. Shift-drag will pan. You can change the number and hit enter to adjust the averaging period.
  • jqPLOT: Is a plotting and charting plugin for the jQuery Javascript framework. jqPlot produces beautiful line, bar and pie charts. qPlot is an open source project by Chris Leonello.
  • ZING CHART: is a JavaScript charting library and feature-rich API set that lets you build interactive Flash or HTML5 charts. It offer over 100 chart types to fit your data.

MAPPING

Instant Atlas data visualization

  • COLOR BREWER: Originally designed with federal funding and developed at Penn State — is really for choosing map colors, and is worth spending some time with if plan to make many more. You can choose your base color and get the codes for the entire palette.
  • EXHIBIT: Developed by MIT, and fully open-source, Exhibit makes it easy to create interactive maps, and other data-based visualizations that are orientated towards teaching or static/historical based data sets, such as flags pinned to countries, or birth-places of famous people.
  • INSTANT ATLAS: enables information analysts and researchers to create highly-interactive dynamic and profile reports that combine statistics and map data to improve data visualization, enhance communication, and engage people in more informed decision making

TIMELINES

Timeline data visualization

  • TIMELINE: Is a fantastic widget which renders a beautiful interactive timeline that responds to the user’s mouse, making it easy to create advanced timelines that convey a lot of information in a compressed space. Each element can be clicked to reveal more in-depth information, making this a great way to give a big-picture view while still providing full detail.
  • HERE IS TODAY: is a great example of an interactive timeline which continues to zoom out to give relative times all based on today. It seems simple, but is an example of several good aspects of data visualization design. It compares today with a month, then a year, then century, etc. It isn’t overwhelming the reader with all the data at once, or forcing the person to choose only one interpretation.
  • TIMEFLOW: Allows you to create time-based diagrams easily and quickly. Designed for journalists, it allows for a variety of different ways to visualise the data and help you understand any underlying trends.

INFOGRAPHICS:

infographic data visualization

  • VISUAL.LY: Is a combined gallery and infographic generation tool. It offers a simple toolset for building stunning data representations, as well as a platform to share your creations. This goes beyond pure data visualisation, but if you want to create something that stands on its own, it’s a fantastic resource and an info-junkie’s dream come true.
  • PIKTOCHART; Is a web-based tool that has good free themes and a whole bunch more for the paid version) for creating simple visualizations. You can drag and drop different shapes and images, and there is quite a bit of customization available. You can also add simple line, bar, and pie charts using data from CSV (or manual entry). The invfographic in our previous blog, 6 more studies prove Digital Marketing ROI was created with Piktochart.

MULTI-USE:

tableau data visualization

  • GOOGLE CHARTS: The seminal charting solution for much of the web, Google Charts is highly flexible and has an excellent set of developer tools behind it. It’s an especially useful tool for specialist visualizations such as geocharts and gauges, and it also includes built-in animation and user interaction controls.
  • NVD3: Is a library meant for reuse. The project takes all the power of D3 and distills them down into common chart types. I really like this idea because it gives you constrains and prevents you from running wild with different designs, while at the same time making the code much easier and more approachable if you are just getting started in data visualization.
  • TABLEAU: Places great emphasis on the ability to create visualizations without the need for any technical skills (scripting). and has a relatively easy to use interface. As with other products of this nature its utility is firmly anchored in visual exploration of data using every format imaginable. It is not a data mining tool or a text analytics tool, but sits in the traditional business intelligence camp, albeit with a rich visual interface.

BarnRaisers are big believers in the wisdom of Peter Drucker and practitioners in data visualization. Let us show you how we use them to better tell the s story of your business and achieve your goals.

Which of these 14 tools are of interest to you? Do they convince you of the power of data visualization? Do you want to use them better tell the story of your business?

6 more studies prove Digital Marketing ROI 0

Posted on November 23, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

Show me the ROI

TV and Digital are the two media channels that now receive the most ad spending. They are the only two media channels where ad spending is increasing as opposed to Print, Radio and Outdoor where it is decreasing. If current trends continue, Digital is expected to overtake TV by 2018.

Digital Marketing Spending Trends

Marketers spend more in Digital but many companies ask: Show me the ROI!

To better understand Digital Marketing ROI and this trend, we recently published 11 Studies Prove the ROI of Digital Marketing. Below is an Infographic of our findings from Piktochart, a  company that offers an all-in-one online infographic application where anyone can create custom infographics, banners, reports and presentations online utilizing an easy interface that everyone can use.

11 studies is a significant number. If you need more convincing, here are 6 more studies that prove Digital Marketing ROI.

    1. ADAGE: (WHERE DO WE SPENT OUR TIME?) At 3.9 hours daily, TV viewing remains the most time-consuming media activity, followed closely by going on the internet with a computer, not for work, at 3.8 hours. 95% of respondents go online at home; plus, 57% go online using their mobile phone, and 16% do so for at least 3 hours daily. If computer and mobile are added for internet usage, consumers now spend more of their leisure time on the internet than TV,
    2. HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW (HOW DO WE BUY?): In Branding in the Digital Age, You’re Spending Your Money in All the Wrong Places, HBR reports the internet has changed the way we buy: Once, a shopper would systematically winnow his brand choices to arrive at a final selection. Now, relying heavily on digital interactions, he or she evaluates a shifting array of options and remains engaged with the brand through social media after a purchase. Consumers today connect with brands in fundamentally new ways through the internet and social channels.
    3. INTERACTIVE ADVERTISING BUREAU (IAB) (WHAT CAN WE MEASURE?): The IAB, 4 A’s and ANA concluded that brand engagement was not a single event; rather, it was a continuum of activities that were cognitive, behavior and emotional. They then demonstrated by detailing every possible touch point of the consumer journey how the engagement “journey” could be measured for digital through survey, eye tracking, web analytics, social listening and social analytics more effectively than any other media channel.
    4. MCKINSEY (WHY DOES IT WORK?): McKinsey analyzed 24 customer touch points for more than 9,000 new car buyers to better understand which touch points drive customers’ premium perceptions and willingness to pay. Among their conclusions: 1) Digital channels dominate the purchasing “journey,” 2) digital customers demand seamless integration, 3) digital products secure loyalty and 4) digital sales are bigger than expected.
    5. SEORCHERS (HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?): To reach 1,000 viewers, it costs between $1-$3 for Online (Search) and $5-$10 for Online (Display). This compares to $10 for Cable TV, $24-$30 for Prime Time TV, $40 for Radio and $100 for Magazine. Plus, 90% of all purchase decisions begin online.
    6. SYNCAPSE (WHAT IS THE ROI OF WORD OF MOUTH?): Sharing, comments, Likes, reviews and ratings are prevalent on the internet. Do they influence buying behavior? What is their value? Syncapse has been measuring word of mouth since 2010 to understand the value of a Facebook Fan. They measure Fans for over 20 major brands including BMW, Coca-Cola, Disney, McDonald’s, Starbucks and Walmart. In the latest year (2013), the average value of a Brand Fan increased 28% to $174.17. This is because Facebook Brand Fans are: 1) 85% more likely to advocate their brand versus 60% for non-Fan users, 2) Spend 42% more in respective categories than non-Fans, despite no income difference and 3) 11% more likely to continue using their brands than non-fan users.

Newer media channels always have more to prove. If your company requires proof points, 17 studies that cover a wide range of industries and media properties should satisfy those who need convincing.

Do these studies prove Digital Marketing ROI to you?

Digital Marketing ROI Infographic

 

  • About

    BarnRaisers is a full service digital marketing consultancy and agency. We build brands with ROI and proven relationship principles.



↑ Top