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30 stunning stats to develop a strong SEO strategy 0

Posted on December 04, 2016 by Rob Petersen

seo strategy

SEO strategy is a strong way to build a successful business on the internet.

89% of customers begin their buying process with a search engine.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the process of getting traffic from the “free,” “organic,” “editorial” or “natural” search results on search engines. It requires resources, tactics and, most of all, a strategy.

Here are 30 stunning stats to develop a strong SEO strategy.

  1. 90% of B2B researchers who are online use search specifically to research business purchases (Google)
  2. 73% of in-house marketers and 76% of US agencies say SEO provides excellent or good return on investment (ROI) (eMarketer)
  3. 72% of marketers worldwide say relevant content creation was the most effective SEO tactic (Marketing Profs)
  4. 72% of all people who perform a local search ended up frequenting a store that was within five miles of them (WordStream)
  5. 71% of B2B researchers start their research with a generic search (Google)
  6. 70% of the links search users click on are organic (Search Engine Journal)
  7. 67% of mobile users will leave a website if they become frustrated with the site’s navigation (Search Engine Watch)
  8. 66% of marketers say improving SEO and growing their organic presence is their top inbound marketing priority. (HubSpot)
  9. 65% of smartphone users agree that when conducting a search on their smartphones, they look for the most relevant information regardless of the company providing the information (HubSpot)
  10. 61% of marketers from enterprises cite lead generation as a top SEO priority (Conductor)
  11. 61% of consumers say they are more likely to contact a local business if they have a mobile optimized site (BrightLocal)
  12. 60% of all organic clicks go to the organic top 3 search engine results (HubSpot)
  13. 57% of marketers from enterprises cite increased web traffic as a top SEO priority (Conductor)
  14. 50% of search queries are 4 or more words (so target those long-tail keywords) (WordStream)
  15. 72% of marketers say relevant said keyword/phrase research was the most effective SEO tactic (Marketing Profs)
  16. 53% more likely that your website will show up on page 1 of Google if you have video on the landing page (Business2Community)
  17. 48% of consumers start mobile research with a search engine(HubSpot)
  18. 47% of consumers expect a web page to load in 2 seconds or less (Kissmetrics)
  19. 42% of researchers use a mobile device during the B2B purchasing process (Google)
  20. 40% of consumers turn to a competitor’s site after a bad experience. (Google)
  21. 34% clickthrough rate to the website that is in the #1 on desktops (HubSpot)
  22. 33% of search traffic goes to the entry that is the #1 listing in Google (Chitika)
  23. 33% of marketers say relevant link building is the most effective SEO tactic (Marketing Profs)
  24. 30% of mobile searches are related to a location. (Google)
  25. 28% of marketers worldwide say social media integration was the most effective SEO tactic (Marketing Profs)
  26. 25% more clicks and 27% more profits when using organic SEO techniques and a PPC campaign together versus using just one or the other (Business2Community)
  27. 20% of search queries on Google’s mobile app and on Android devices are voice searches (HubSpot)
  28. 18% of local smartphone searches lead to a purchase within a day compared to 7% on non-local searches (Google)
  29. 15% close rate from SEO leads, while outbound leads (such as direct mail or print advertising) have a 1.7% close rate (Search Engine Journal)
  30. As of May 2015, more Google searches take place on mobile devices than on computers in 10 countries including the US and Japan. (Google)

Are these stats stunning to you? Do they prove the value of an SEO Strategy? Does your business need help developing one?

11 inspiring case studies of digital transformation 0

Posted on November 27, 2016 by Rob Petersen

digital transformation

  • 88% of companies report they are undergoing digital transformation (source: Altimeter Group)
  • 85% of enterprise decision makers say they have a time frame of two years to make significant inroads into digital transformation or they will suffer financially and fall behind their competitors (source: PWC)
  • 25% of companies have a clear understanding of new and underperforming digital touchpoints (source: Altimeter Group)

In other words, many companies report they are undergoing digital transformation even though most don’t know how to go about it.

Digital transformation is profound change in business activities, processes, competencies and models to fully leverage customers at every touchpoint in the customer experience.

Successful digital transformation achieve these results:

  • CUSTOMER: Harness customer networks and reinvent the path to purchase in line with their real behaviors
  • COMPETITION: Rethink the competition and build platforms that deliver competitive advantage
  • DATA: Turn data into assets that prove results in real time
  • INNOVATION: Innovate by rapid experimentation
  • VALUE: Judge change by how digital transformation helps create the next business

Since digital transformation doesn’t happen overnight, it also doesn’t hurt to show short term wins along the way.

Need some examples? Here are 11 inspiring case studies of digital transformation.

  1. AMAZON BUSINESS: Served as an example of ‘digital customer’ expectations transitioning to the B2B world. Features include: free two-day shipping on orders of $49 or more, exclusive price discounts, hundreds of millions of products, purchasing system integration, tax-exempt purchasing for qualified customers, shared payment methods, order approval workflows, and enhanced order reporting among others. Amazon Business launched in April 2015, with over 250 million products and a more holistic marketplace for B2B companies.
  2. AUDI: Changed the way in which companies sell vehicles, with the introduction of an innovative showroom concept launched in 2012 named Audi City. Audi City provided a unique brand experience and allows visitors to explore the entire catalogue of Audi’s model range hands-on in stores located in city centers, where large showrooms are not a possibility. At Audi City London sales went up 60% from the traditional Audi showroom that previously occupied the site. Moreover, they only stock four cars, reducing the cost of having to hold a large volume of stock that often does not match a customer’s criteria.
  3. FORD: Was structured, in early 2006, as a loose confederacy of regional business centers and IT silos. From 2006 on, they moved forward with clear goals: simplifying the company’s product line, focusing in on quantitative data and quality vehicles, and unifying the company as a whole. On the IT front, Ford slashed the budget by a massive 30 percent. Their goal, however, was not to reduce expenses, but to take resources that were tied up in maintaining fragmented and complex legacy systems and free them for use in expansion and innovation. It was all of these measures together that gave Ford the agility and capital to invest in ground-breaking projects such as the much-lauded Ford SYNC and MyFord Touch.
  4. GENERAL ELECTRIC: GE’s Digital Wind Farm is an adaptable wind energy ecosystem that pairs turbines with the digital infrastructure for the wind energy industry. GE’s previous solution, Wind PowerUp technology, had already been installed in 4,000 units, and improved turbine efficiency by up to 5%, which translates to up to a 20% improvement in profitability for each turbine; the new Digital Windfarm technology promised 20% efficiency improvements, which could help generate up to an estimated $50 billion of value for the energy industry.
  5. GLASSDOOR: Covered more than 450,000+ companies in over 190 countries and territories. More than 3,000 companies pay to use the company’s branding and recruiting tools (55,000+ free employer accounts). Glassdoor used its data for labor market research in the US; a portfolio of Fortune’s “Best Companies to Work For” companies outperformed the S&P 500 by 84.2%, while a similar portfolio of Glassdoor’s “Best Places to Work” outperformed the overall market by 115.6%.
  6. LEGO: After a period of expansion (1970-1991) LEGO suffered a steady decline (1992-2004) and by 2004 LEGO was close to bankruptcy. Reaching a tipping point, LEGO started restructuring and digital transformation focused on new revenue sources coming from movies, mobile games and mobile applications. LEGO achieved an EBITDA margin of 37.1% in 2014, an increase of 15% since 2007. In 2014, the first LEGO movie achieved revenues of approximately $468 million with a production budget of only $60 million.
  7. MCCORMICK & COMPANY: Launched FlavorPrint, an online flavor recommendation tool that visually represents consumer’s tastes. Consumers start with a 20 question quiz about eating habits and food likes and dislikes. FlavorPrint takes this data and generates personalized suggestions about recipes using algorithms. It has been dubbed “the Netflix for food” for its ability to suggest recipes based on individual’s tastes. FlavorPrint has been such a success that McCormick spun off into its own technology company called Vivanda
  8. MCDONALD’S: Recognized a massive shift in consumer behavior. For example, in 2015, McDonald’s began installing kiosks where customers can quickly customize their hamburgers. One of their more recent undertakings was for the 2015 Super Bowl football championship. McDonald’s used social media to give away products related to the commercials they aired throughout the game. It was important for McDonald’s to have the ability to respond immediately to consumers and actively monitor social media trends in real time. The effort was a success and drew over 1.2 million retweets including high-profile celebrities such as Taylor Swift.
  9. NETSPRESSO: Had the desire with its digital transformation to win new customers, gain a deeper understanding of its customers, and manage complex buying processes. But it was guided by the company’s clear goal: To provide customer’s with the perfect coffee experience. Netspresso’s initiatives are supported by a modern customer engagement solution based in the cloud, complete with network capability. Its cloud solution serves as an innovation platform with a full-fledged sales solution capable of handling the entire buying cycle: pricing, quotes, and orders. Nespresso’s digital initiatives have proven fruitful. Benefits include greater penetration into new markets, higher sales and user adoption, better sales productivity, and better visibility across the entire engagement cycle.
  10. STARBUCKS: COO Kevin Johnson perhaps sums it up best: “Where others are attempting to build a mobile app, Starbucks has built an end-to-end consumer platform anchored around loyalty.” The company’s main innovation is their Mobile Order and Pay app. This is fundamentally a customer-first strategy, as it addresses the basic wants of the consumer: convenience, line avoidance, and so forth. Coupled with their extensive loyalty program, the app gives Starbucks the perfect venue to up-sell and market to consumers. Furthermore, the app funnels back massive amounts of user data to the company, allowing them to better understand their customers’ habits and desires.
  11. UNDER ARMOUR: Wanted to become much more than an athletic apparel company when they introduced “connected fitness”— a platform to track, analyze and share personal health data right to customers’ phones. This new application provides a stream of information to UA that enables them to immediately identify fitness and health trends. For example, Under Armour, which is based in Baltimore, was able to immediately recognize a walking trend that started in Australia. This allowed them to deploy localized marketing and distribution efforts way before their competitors knew what was happening.

Does this help explain digital transformation to you? Do these case studies relate to your business? Does your business need help with a digital transformation roadmap?

50 essential facts about Google every marketer needs to know 0

Posted on November 20, 2016 by Rob Petersen

Google

Google is 20 years old this year. The company began as a research project, nicknamed “Backrub,” between Larry Page and Sergey Brin, PhD student at Stanford University. “Backrub” was to find out what web pages link to a given page based on backlinks. The goals was to help make it easier to find citations in academic publishing.

Although they didn’t know it, Page and Brin created the world’s first search engine. Quickly, they were to find out a much larger audience than academics was interested in this advancement.

Today, Google is the world’s largest search engine, video provider and online advertising network. It’s hard to imagine a business that doesn’t rely on the company in one way or another,

Here are 50 facts about Google every marketer needs to know.

  1. 117 billion unique searches occur on Google every month (Search Engine Land)
  2. $74.5 billion is Google’s global revenue; $67.4 billion is revenue from advertising (Statista)
  3. $1.6 billion is how much Google paid to acquire YouTube (CNN)
  4. 6 billion videos are watched on YouTube every month (DMR)
  5. 1.6 billion smartphone users worldwide use Android system (LunaMetrics)
  6. 1 billion unique users each month are on YouTube (LunaMetrics)
  7. 1 billion people use Gmail (DMR)
  8. 1 billion YouTube video are viewed on mobile device every day (DMR)
  9. 500 million Gmail accounts have been created (LunaMetrics)
  10. 10 million to 25 million websites use Google Analytics (LunaMetrics)
  11. 2.3 million searches occur on Google every second (Business Insider)
  12. 1.2 million businesses advertise on Google Search Networks (Wishpond)
  13. $400,000 is the average cost for a YouTube home page ad (Wishpond)
  14. 300,000 mobile apps currently serve Google Mobile Ads (Wishpond)
  15. 57,000 people are employed at Google’s Mountain View headquarters (CNN)
  16. 323 days of YouTube videos are viewed on Facebook every minute (DMR)
  17. 200 factors are taken into account before Google delivers you the best results to your query in 1/8 of a second (Business Insider)
  18. 127 companies have been acquired by Google in the past 12 years (Spinfold)
  19. 88 languages are available on Google (Spinfold)
  20. 40 languages are available on Google Analytics (Pop Creative)
  21. 40 minute is the average time spent on YouTube per session (DMR)
  22. 10 years is how long Gmail has been around (DMR)
  23. $135 is the highest cost per action on Google AdWords which comes from the legal industry (Search Engine Land)
  24. $55 is the most expensive word, insurance, Gongle AdWords (MediaVision)
  25. $7 is the lowest cost per action which comes from the Dating and Personals industry (Search Engine Land)
  26. 10 Super Bowl audiences is the viewership of YouTube (Wishpond)
  27. Searches doubled when Google introduced the “Did you mean?” function (Spinfold)
  28. $2 in revenue is how much businesses make on every $1 of spend on Google AdWords (Wishpond)
  29. #1 search engine in the world; Google also owns YouTube, the #2 search engine in the world (Social Media Today)
  30. 92% of startups use Gmail (LunaMetrics)
  31. 90% of Google’s revenue came from advertising in 2015 (Business Insider)
  32. 80% of the global smartphone market uses Android systems (LunaMetrics)
  33. 75% of Gmail users open their email on a mobile device (DMR)
  34. 72% of marketers plan to increase their Google AdWords spending (Wishpond)
  35. 70% of businesses with mobile phones that list on Google Ads receive a call (Wishpond)
  36. 67% percent of searches in the U.S. occur on Google; 20% of searches occur on Bing (LunaMetrics)
  37. 57% of American kids use Google as their first word (Spinfold)
  38. 56% of internet users Google themselves (Spinfold)
  39. Over 50% of Google searches occur on mobile devices since April 2015 (Business Insider)
  40. 50% of smartphone users in the US use Android systems; compared to 40% for Apple (LunaMetrics)
  41. 50% of mid-sized businesses use Gmail (LunaMetrics)
  42. 50% of business websites use Google Analytics (LunaMetrics)
  43. 40% drop in global internet traffic occur when Google went down once for 5 minutes (Business Insider)
  44. 31% of global digital advertising is controlled by Google (LunaMetrics)
  45. 25% of Americans use Gmail during working hours (DMR)
  46. 20% of mobile queries on Google are voice searches (Search Engine Land)
  47. 20% of Google’s ad revenue comes from the Google Display Network (LunaMetrics)
  48. 0.1% of emails in Gmail are spam (DMR)
  49. Google employs the largest network of translator in the world (Spinfold)
  50. Industries with the highest CPC’s (Cost-Per-Click) on Google Adwords are insurance, banking and legal (LunaMetrics)

Did you know all these facts about Google. Do you find them worth knowing?

10 very real reasons polls get it wrong 0

Posted on November 13, 2016 by Rob Petersen

polls

Polls are a record of public opinion. Here are polls taken on Monday, November 7, the day before election day, from very reliable organizations.

  • Clinton 44%, Trump 41%, Johnson 4%, Stein 2% (Bloomberg)
  • Clinton 44%, Trump 39%, Johnson 6%, Stein 3% (Reuters/Ipsos)
  • Clinton 45%, Trump 41%, Johnson 5%, Stein 2% (Economist)
  • Clinton 48%, Trump 44%, Johnson 3%, Stein 2% (FOX News)

What happened?

Polls have been a part of elections since the country was founded. The language of the Declaration of Independence requires we function with “the consent of the governed.” But this election shook up a lot of things. One of them was our faith in polls.

Should we conclude polls and the people who conduct now don’t know what they’re doing? Or, is it that good analysis is always depends on quality data and a sound methodology.

Judge for yourself. Here are 10 very real reasons polls get it wrong.

  1. SAMPLING: Probability sampling is the fundamental basis for all polls. The basic principle: A randomly selected small sample of a population represents the attitudes, opinions and projected behavior of all people. But random samples almost never occur organically.
  2. SAMPLE RESPONSE RATES. For example, women and older Americans tend to answer the phone more often. This is how most polls are still conducted. This throws off the sex and age ratios of the sample. Instead of relying exclusively on random number dialing, pollsters take the extra step of adjusting or weighting results to match the demographic profile of likely voters.
  3. NON-RESPONSE RATES: Adding to problem of creating a random sample, response rates are way down. In 1997, Pew Research, a very well respected research and polling organization, saw telephone response rates were 36%. By 2012, Pew reported a downward trend to an average response rate of 9%.
  4. WEIGHTING: Since it is virtually impossible for a company conducting polls to expect a random sample much less that participants even answer their phones, weights are assigned to demographic characteristics of the total sample of respondents to match the latest estimates of demographic characteristics available from the U.S. Census Bureau. Weighting has a major impact on the results of polls.
  5. CENSUS RESULTS: Census results reflect hard facts such as age, race, address and family size. They do not reflect characteristics like religion and group affiliations. Beliefs and values that are more likely to determine people’s actions.
  6. BRADLEY EFFECT: We don’t always say in polls what we do. It’s called the Bradley Effect, after Tom Bradley, an African-American candidate for governor of California in 1982. Polls incorrectly predicted he would win. Looking back, experts think that’s because people told pollsters they would vote for Bradley, even though they didn’t plan to, in order to avoid sounding racist.
  7. PHONE SURVEYS: The majority of political polls are still surveys done by phone. That’s because someone’s email is more private and protected than their phone number. Surveys conducted over the phone are a pretty antiquated way to conduct research in the computer age. On the phone, the Bradley effect is more likely to occur than online because someone else is hearing and recording your answers. CNET reported Trumps polls a lot better online than in a polls conducted over the phone.
  8. GROUPS: Census numbers can tell us how many Asian-Americans live in a particular state. They can’t reliably tell us how many conservatives or evangelicals are in that state or groups that systematically exclude themselves from polls at higher rates than other groups. There’s no easy way to fix the problem and know the group that someone belongs.
  9. MULTIPLE AFFILIATIONS: Even if pollsters could reliably align weighted samples with groups, none of us are singularly dedicated to one group. We have multiple affiliations. We belong to a particular religion, participate at a certain level in community affairs and have specific views on the environment. So, even if polls could accurately correlate Census information with groups, there are multiple factors and sub-segments to consider.
  10. EXIT POLLS: In any race, there is a fascination with who is likely to be the winner. So there are exit polls to gauge how the race is going. They’re usually based on a sample of a few dozen precincts or so in a specific state, sometimes not even including many more than 1,000 respondents. Like every other type of survey, they’re subject to a margin of error because of sampling and additional error resulting from various forms of response bias.

Did these reasons explain to you how polls get it wrong? Does your organization need guidance understanding data and its results?

 

20 companies do data mining and make their business better 0

Posted on November 07, 2016 by Rob Petersen

Data Mining

Data mining is: 1) The practice of examining large databases to generate new information and 2) the process of analyzing data from different perspectives to make it insightful and useful.

Data mining is used by companies to increase revenue, decrease costs, identify customers, provide better customer service, listen to what others are saying and do competitive intelligence. And that’s just some of the ways.

Here’s are 20 companies that do data mining and prove it makes their business better.

  1. AMAZON: With $5 off, for those who use the Amazon Price Check Mobile App – to scan the products in store, take a picture of the product or perform a text search to find the lowest prices, the app also prompts the customers to submit the in-store price. Amazon is collecting intelligence and valuable pricing information from its competitors.
  2. ARBY’S: The fast food company uses data mining to help them determine the best targets for their advertisements. They can see which advertisements are most effective, while seeing the channels that are most receptive to each ad pitch. This allows them to ensure every advertisement utilizes the appropriate channel to increase the number of leads from their marketing.
  3. CAPITAL ONE: Data mining and big data management to help them ensure the success of all customer offerings. By analyzing the demographic data and spending habits of customers, they’re able to determine the most optimal times to present various offers to clients, thus increasing the conversion rates of their offers and gaining more leads from their marketing budget.
  4. DELTA: Large airlines like Delta, monitors tweets to find out how their customers feel about delays, upgrades and in-flight entertainment. When a customer tweets negatively about his lost baggage, the airline forwards to their support team. The support team sends a representative to the passengers destination presenting him a free first class upgrade ticket on his return along with the information about the tracked baggage promising to deliver it as soon as he or she steps out of the plane.
  5. DUETTO: Known online for their “hotel optimization,” Duetto makes it easier for companies to personalize data to individuals searching online for hotels. Duetto makes it easy for hotels to personalize their prices by taking data such as how much you typically spend at the bar or casino to incentivize you with a lower price for your room. Therefore the hotel can give you a better price, knowing you’ll spend money on other services. The hotel can give you a better price, knowing you’ll spend money on other services.
  6. EXPRESS SCRIPTS: Which processes pharmaceutical claims, realized that those who most need to take their medications were also those most likely to forget to take their medications. So they created a new product: Beeping medicine caps and automated phone calls reminding patients it’s time to take the next dose.
  7. FREE PEOPLE: The more bohemian segment of Urban Outfitters, uses millions of customer records (reviewed by an in house analytics team) to shape the next season’s offerings. Information like what sold, what didn’t, what was returned and more fuels the brand’s product recommendations, the look of its website and what kinds of promotions customers see to improve Free People’s bottom line.
  8. GOOGLE AND CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL (CDC): Google proposed a different approach. Using historical data from the CDC, Google compared search term queries against geographical areas that were known to have had flu outbreaks. Google found spikes in certain search terms where flu outbreaks occurred and identified forty-five terms that were strongly correlated with the outbreak of flu. Google then started tracking the use of those terms and is now able to accurately predict when a flu outbreak is occurring in real time. Using this data, the CDC can act immediately.
  9. KOHL’S: Customers are more likely to respond to an offer when it’s at the moment of purchase. That’s why Kohl’s does real-time, personalized offers. Shoppers can opt in for offers via their smartphones.  So if a shopper lingers in the shoe department, for example, they can receive a coupon on the shoes they looked at online but never bought,
  10. KREDITECH:  European company, uses more than 8,000 sources including social media, to create a unique credit score for consumers, which is then sells to banks and other lenders. And they have discovered some surprising correlations between social media behaviors and financial stability. For example, if your Facebook friends use all capital letters, your score is docked.
  11. MACY’S: Through sentiment analysis of big data, Macy’s finds out that people who are sharing tweets about “Jackets” are also making use of the terms “Michael Kors” and “Louis Vuitton” frequently. This information helps the retailer to identify what brands of jackets should be offered discounts in their future advertising campaigns to attract customers.
  12. MCDONALD’S: With more than 34K local restaurants serving 69 million customers across 118 countries , 62 million daily customer traffic, selling 75 burgers every second, $27 billion annual revenue- McDonald’s is using big data analytics to gain lot more insight to improve operations at its various stores and enhance customer experience. McDonald’s analytics system analyse data about various factors such as wait times, information on the menu, the size of the orders, ordering patterns of the customers.
  13. NETFLIX: To create data models and find what makes show or movie popular among consumers, according to the insights they gained from their data, House of Cards was the ultimate entertainment experience. They went all out, winning a bidding war with other companies over the rights and immediately scheduled two seasons of content before showing a thing. It was a huge success, and the best part is they almost knew it would be.
  14. NORDSTROM: With 225 retail outlets, Nordstrom generates petabytes of data from its 4.5 million Pinterest followers, 300,000 Twitter followers and 2 million likes on Facebook. Their analytics system monitors customer behaviour by tracking – How many people enter the store, which section they walk in, how long they stay at the store and for how long they shop in a particular section. This helps Nordstrom decide what products should be promoted to which customers when and through what advertising channel.
  15. PANDORA: With 72 million users and the data for approximately 200 million users’ listening habits, Pandora is a name to reckon with in the music industry for providing music recommendations that people really love. Apart from the data like gender, age, zip code that users provide at sign up, Pandora tracks all the songs that a particular user likes and dislikes, from which location they listen, from which devices they listen and more – to provide customers with curated music catalogue based on interests and demographics.
  16. PREDPOL:  The Los Angeles and Santa Cruz police departments, a team of educators and a company called PredPol have taken an algorithm used to predict earthquakes, tweaked it and started feeding it crime data. The software can predict where crimes are likely to occur down to 500 square feet. In LA, there’s been a 33% reduction in burglaries and 21% reduction in violent crimes in areas where the software is being used.
  17. STARBUCKS: As the leading coffeehouse company in the world, Starbucks manages to open new stores in very close proximity with their other stores, while still guaranteeing a high success rate. Normally, when expanding a company, it’s needlessly risky to open a new location just a block from another location.
  18. T-MOBILE: Data mining helps reduce customer turnover rate. By analyzing big data, T-Mobile can determine the core causes for turnover, allowing them to implement effective solutions that will keep more clients on board. As a telecom company, they accrue boundless quantities of data every year, and without big data management, the ability to analyze the data would be greatly inhibited.
  19. THOMSON REUTERS: Financial experts can gain competitive advantage by analysing the twitter sentiment data by tracking specific tweets from various companies and people. This helps financial professionals get an overview on the number of positive and negative sentiments related to any given company. Sentiment analysis along with other advanced big data analytics solution helps the financial professionals spot the financial market and any events impacting the company as they happen.
  20. WALMART: The mega-retailer’s latest search engine for Walmart.com includes semantic data. Polaris, a platform that was designed in-house, relies on text analysis, machine learning and even synonym mining to produce relevant search results. Wal-Mart says adding semantic search has improved online shoppers completing a purchase by 10% to 15%. “In Wal-Mart terms, that is billions of dollars,” Laney said.

Do these companies prove how data mining could make your business better? Could your company benefit from data mining?

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