Building brand with proven relationship principles and ROI

BarnRaisers


Archive for the ‘Case Studies’


15 B2B case studies show how content marketing drives ROI 1

Posted on January 25, 2015 by Rob Petersen

 

 

B2B Content Marketing Case Studies

  • 70% of content marketers are creating more content than they did a year ago (source: Content Marketing Institute)
  • 35% say they have a documented content strategy (source: Content Marketing Institute)
  • 21% say they are successful at tracking ROI (source: Ad Age)

Content marketing is more important to B2B businesses. Who is succeeding and why? Below is a infographic that details B2B Content Marketing Trends for 2015.

Here are 15 B2B case studies. They show how content marketing drives ROI with B2B businesses who:

  • Know their audience
  • Don’t create content for the sake of creating content
  • Use specific content solutions to impact different stages of the buying cycle
  • Integrate internally with their teams
  1. ADP: Developed a content marketing campaign to connect and engage with their target audience on a ADP solution using white papers and a diagnostic assessment tool. The campaign generated over $1 million in new sales opportunities with several deals closed within the first 3 months of launch.
  2. CISCO: Has long been engaged in social media activity, often running campaigns alongside its ongoing engagement strategy. To demonstrate the extent to which this has impacted the company, it launched a new router using only social channels and saved an estimated $100,000.
  3. CROWE HORWATH: the public accounting firm used 48 pieces of content in 4 different topic areas, this campaign targeted C-level prospects in financial institutions with $1 billion or more in assets across the buying cycle. Content tactics included: executive briefs, case studies, infographics, checklists, Q and A, and Brainshark video. 778 contacts were engaged with a 70% open rate (vs. 10%), 2 engagement worth $250k in revenue.
  4. DEMANDBASEA B2B marketing cloud, helped B2B marketers make the right content technology investment by using a white paper, infographic, webinar, Slideshare and a live presentation to spotlight tools that can maximize the power of content. The results of the campaign generated 1,700 leads, 125 webinar participants, 5,000 views on Slideshare and $1 million in new business.
  5. FISHER TANK: Makes giant, above-ground welded steel tanks. With clients in the fuel industries, waste water, pulp & paper and other industrial and municipal areas, projects tend to be big (multi-million dollar) and take a long time to sell (12 months and longer). For more than 60 years, the company has made its sales primarily through cold calling and referrals from existing clients. So it took some moxy to launch a content marketing strategy online. The plan including sprucing up the website, integrating a blog and social sharing, and offering some valuable content by free download. The campaign increased web traffic by 119%, traffic from social media by 4800%, lead conversions by 3900%, quote requests by 500% and new qualified sales opportunities by $3.4 million.
  6. IBM: developed a social sales program for their inside sales team. They identified their target audience and monitored social media platforms for relevant topics and conversation. The company trained their sales team to nurture online relationships and drive prospects to team members’ websites. As a result of this focus on social sales and personnel training, IBM saw a 400% in sales.
  7. LINKEDIN:  Had to be converted to social selling. After the release of tools such as Sales Navigator and TeamLink, LinkedIn’s own sales team began seeing significant results. Ralf VonSosen, the company’s head of marketing for sales solutions notes, “We started seeing a 50% increase in leads to meeting conversion rates.”
  8. LOGICALL: A company that focuses on inbound and outbound customer management solutions, uses content assets such as emails, microsite and ebook, Logicalis developed a thought leadership effort that supported sales teams by enabling custom messaging based on the prospects interaction with the campaign. With a target audience of about 2,000, nearly $8 million in new pipeline business was closed.
  9. MAERSK: Danish shipping company Maersk first began using social back in 2011 to raise brand awareness, gain insight into the market, increase employee satisfaction and get closer to its customers, It focuses on the stories that emerge from within the business, such as how it is helping fuel a boom in the sale of Kenyan avocados and where its staff come from. Its presence on each network is tailored to that platform, so for example on LinkedIn it promotes job vacancies and publishes articles about the work culture within the business, while on Instagram it encourages followers to post photos of its ships using the hashtag #Maersk. Maersk now has more than 1.5m Facebook fans (of which around 15% are customers) and 12,000 Twitter followers, as well as active accounts on Instagram, Tumblr, YouTube, Google+ and
  10. OPENTEXT: A software solution for enterprise information management, created a personalized new customer onboarding site offering a variety of assets (white papers, checklists, product pages, ebooks, case studies) and content to welcome new clients and provide upsell, cross-sell opportunities. The campaign also included a two phase nurturing program. 1,700 new contacts were identified along with 31 new opportunities worth $1.8 million.
  11. OPTUM: A health services business, created an integrated marketing campaign to support the launch of a new solution, support sales and build thought leadership. The content marketing mix included: advertorials, display ads, email, direct mail and a campaign website. The successful campaign earned a 23.5 lead to conversion rate, 475% increase in website traffic, 2,500+ resource downloads, 28% increase in YoY blog followers and $52 million in contract value of new business with less than $ 1,000,000 invested.
  12. RS COMPONENTS: The electronic product distribution company created a specific social hub, spanning four different languages, having the purpose of being a collaboration and engagement hub for Electronic Design Engineering. One of the centrepieces of the site is the free tool store, which includes a free design tool that’s been downloaded more than 60,000 times and the site itself gathered more than 45,000 members within its first 12-month period.
  13. SAP: The global strategy was aimed at enabling cross-cultural information to be efficiently shared around the company. SAP Latin AmericaOne year after implementing this strategy SAP Latin America had more than 100,000 fans and followers (an increase of 900%) and achieved a 17% interaction rate across  the region, while a campaign featuring a social app targeting specific buying centers drove more than 12,000 visitors and a 15% engagement rate. has four Facebook pages, four Twitter feeds and two LinkedIn accounts. These profiles are split out by language (e.g. Portuguese and Spanish) rather than country and aim at achieving a split of 20% promotion material vs. 80% of interesting, engaging content for its community.
  14. SHIPSERV: It’s difficult to imagine the maritime industry getting to grips with social media, but Shipserv one of the leading industry marketplaces, proves that in can be done very successfully.As part of a wider marketing strategy and customer engagement strategy, various social approaches were taken, resulting in greater site traffic, alongside increased brand awareness and lead opportunities.From an initial $30,000 social media marketing investment, it’s estimated the overall results achieved would have cost more than $150,000 through traditional media.
  15. XEROX: Created a targeted “Get Optimistic” campaign to connect with 30 top accounts and partnered with Forbes to create a magazine that offered relevant business tips. 70% of targeted companies interacted with the microsite, readership increased 300-400% over previous email campaigns, added 20,000 new contacts, generated 1,000+ scheduled appointments, and get this: yielded $1.3 BILLION in pipeline revenue.

Do these case studies convince you of the value for content marketing for B2B businesses. Do the trends below help you with direction with your business? Does your B2B business need to learn how to use content marketing effectively?

B2B Content Marketing Trends for 2015

7 best examples of brand communities 0

Posted on November 11, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

brand communities

A Brand Community is “a specialized, non-geographically bound community, based on a structured set of social relations among admirers of a brand.” This is according to Albert Muniz Jr. and Thomas C. O’Guinn who coined the term in 2001 with their study on Brand Community for the Journal of Consumer Research.

Muniz and O’Guinn said Brand Communities exhibit three traditional markers of community:

  • Shared consciousness
  • Rituals and traditions
  • A sense of moral responsibility

Although it would be easy to see how a lot of brands would jump on this bandwagon, the Harvard Business Review said in, Getting Brand Communities Right, it’s not so easy. There are Myths vs Realities about Brand Communities.

  • MYTH #1 :A brand community is a marketing strategy
  • THE REALITY: A brand community is a business strategy
  • MYTH #2: A brand community exists to serve the business
  • THE REALITY: A brand community exists to serve the people in it
  • MYTH #3: Build the brand, and the community will follow
  • THE REALITY: Engineer the community, and the brand will be strong
  • MYTH #4: Brand communities should be love-fests for faithful brand advocates
  • THE REALITY: Smart companies embrace the conflicts that make communities thrive
  • MYTH #5: Opinion leaders build strong communities
  • THE REALITY: Communities are strongest when everyone plays a role
  • MYTH #6: Online social networks are the key to a community strategy
  • THE REALITY: Online networks are just one tool, not a community strategy

How do you separate the myth from reality? Who is getting brand communities right?

Here are 7 best examples of Brand Communities. (All of these Brand Communities have been around for at least 5 years and are growing).

  1. BEING GIRL (PROCTER & GAMBLE): The site was created in 2000 as a destination for young, teenage girls. P&G includes content provided by experts and encourages open discussion with expert advice on topics such as menstruation, eating disorders, acne and dating. They take a big-sister approach. They also advertise the companies products, Always and Tampax. Being Girl is now available in over 25 countries. It has been cited in the book, Groundswell, as delivering 4X the Return on Investment (ROI) of traditional marketing.
  2. FIGMENT (RANDOM HOUSE): Is an online writing community owned by Random House, the biggest general-interest trade book publisher in the world. It was founded by Jacob Lewis and Dana Goodyear in 2010. It currently has over 300,000 users. The target group of the community is mainly teenagers between 13 and 18 years old. It’s succeeded because they gave the community something to do, write and share novels. This isn’t just a community of interest, it’s a community of practice too. They highlight the best contributions of the community.
  3. H&R BLOCK: Tax preparation is a highly seasonal business.  H&R provides immediate access to a tax professional for Q&A through the “Get Answers” section of their website but also connects you to learn and share experiences with others through their H&R Community.  The effort secured 1,500,000 unique visitors and answered 1,000,000 questions for a 15% lift in business versus the period before H&R Block created the community.
  4. HARLEY OWNERS GROUP (HOG): Is a sponsored community, operated by Harley-Davidson for enthusiasts. The HOG is “the grandaddy of all community-building efforts,” serving to promote not just a consumer product, but a lifestyle. The HOG has also served to open new revenue streams for the company, with the production of tie-in merchandise offered to club members. Membership is 1,000,000+. The Harley Owners Group was created in 1983 as a way to build longer-lasting and stronger relationships. At that time, the company was facing bankruptcy.
  5. LUGNET (LEGO): When Lego Group set out to develop Mindstorms NXT, the latest version of its game for building programmable robots, it enlisted help from a group of adult enthusiasts whom it found on Lugnet.com the largest unofficial community of Lego fans. While the marketing target for Mindstorms is mainly teenage boys, the people that Lego reached out to were a group of men in their 40s and 50s who knew each other from communicating and working together on elaborate Lego projects on Lugnet.com.The group’s members, according to a Lego spokesman, contributed “incredibly valuable insights” in hardware, software, design and usability based on their own experiences.
  6. MY STARBUCK IDEA: Is now 6+ years-old and remains the gold standard of crowd sourced tip boxes that have actually worked for a brand and delivered ideas from customers (150,00 plus) with innovations (277) that have actually been implemented. Customers today can order a “skinny” beverage and a cake pop, garner digital rewards for using their Starbucks Card and enjoy free Wi-Fi – all thanks to suggestions from fans. “Our passionate customers and partners have been sharing their ideas with us on My Starbucks Idea, and we have listened and acted upon many amazing innovations that we have received from this online community,” said Alex Wheeler, VP global digital marketing for Starbucks.
  7. ORACLE COMMUNITY (ORACLE): Is a site for people interested in Oracle Corp.’s database and software products. Members share personal stories, pictures, videos and birthdays. They can create blogs on the site, form groups around themes and build networks of designated friends. Members can also schedule meetings and events both online and in person.

These examples show Brand Communities can produce significant results and ROI but they also demonstrate companies should not try to create them unless they accept are willing to accept diversity of opinion, occasional conflict and apply the internal resources necessary to engage.

Do these examples explain Brand Communities? Are they best examples to you?

 

166 case studies prove Social Media ROI (Free eBook) 1

Posted on April 27, 2014 by Rob Petersen

 

 

Social Media ROI

  1. 87% of marketers want to know how to measure their return on investment for social media activities (source: Social Media Examiner)
  2. 85% use social networks in some way; only 14% tie financial metrics to it. (source: AdAge)
  3. Only 8% of companies say they can determine Return on Investment (ROI) from their social media spending (source: Econsultancy).

“How do I measure the return on my social media investment?  This question has been top of mind for marketers for the last three years. Clearly very few marketers have figured this one out.” (source: Social Media Examiner)

If your business struggles with Social Media ROI, you can download, 166 case studies prove Social Media Marketing ROI, a Free eBook over 100,000 people have. No personal information is required and it just takes a click at the BarnRaisers website.

The case studies cover a range of businesses, large and small businesses, B2C and B2B and profit and non-profit, enough to find one relevant to your brand. The chapters are organized to show with real examples how social media works with SEO, CRM, content marketing, customer service and promotion to help brands overachieve ROI.

But mostly, these are stories of courage. People made them happen. Many of the case studies occur during the worst part of a very bad recession. Social media was put to the test during often after traditional marketing failed and was the only affordable option, which makes the results that much more extraordinary.

Here are 4 videos of businesses  and people featured who took that leap of faith. You can listen to their stories and the results they achieved that exceeded expectations:

  • AJ BOMBERS: In 2009, after six month of break-even sales and no money for traditional marketing, Joe Sorge, the owner of AJ Bombers, a burger restaurant in Milwaukee, started using Twitter to attract customers. Joe proved Twitter to be an invaluable customer service tool. Within a year, weekly sales increased +60%. Today, there is also an AJ Bombers in Madison, at Miller Park, the Milwaukee Brewers Stadium and 23,600 people follow the brand on Twitter.

  •  BLENTEC: Has manufactured blenders since the 1970′s. Mostly for B2B use (e.g. Starbucks used Blendtec blenders to grind coffee beans) , the company decided to create awareness among B2C as well as B2B audiences through commercials that ran on YouTube and cost less than $1000 each. CEO, Tom Dickson, did some rather unconventional product demos.  Company sales went from flat to a +700% increase within two years. The campaign started in 2007 and is still running today. Here is most recent video in this 7-year campaign

  •  H&R BLOCK: Used Facebook and Twitter during the tax season to provide immediate access to a tax professional for Q&A in the “Get It Right” social media campaign.  The effort secured 1,500,000 unique visitors and answered 1,000,000 questions for a 15% lift in business versus the prior year when there was no social media “Get It Right” program. Here’s how Amy Worley explained the company’s use of social media.

  • FOILED CUPCAKES: A Chicago company that bakes cupcakes generated 93% of its business through social media leads to surpass revenue targets by +600%.  But, the most impressive statistic is this company has no storefront (it sells only through a website) and success was achieved through the relationship building and conversational benefits of social media.

This self-published eBook began as a series of case study blogs in 2010 and was compiled into an eBook in 2012. It resulted in an invitation to join the MBA Faculty of Rutgers CMD in 2010 where I teach Measurement and ROI at Rutgers Social Media Marketing Mini-MBA. The invitation came because people in the administration had been reading the blogs. The ROI has exceeded my expectations.

Does your businesses struggle with ROI? Do these case studies prove Social Media ROI to you? Do the stories behind these businesses offer inspiration for your brand?

10 case studies prove the ROI of brand advocates 15

Posted on December 07, 2013 by Rob Petersen

 

 

 

Brand Advocates

brand advocate is a person, or customer who talks favorably about a brand or product, and then passes on positive word-of-mouth (WOM) messages to other people.

According to Forrester, Zuberance and an infographic from Jay Baer (below), the influence of brand advocates accounts for billions of dollars in purchases for everything from cars to computers, hotel rooms, movies, enterprise software, and more. Brand advocates are:

  • 5X more valuable than average customers
  • Spend at least 2X as much as average customers
  • Spend 3X as much as average customers over their lifetime of their relationship with a company or brand
  • Reach 150 people in social media every time they advocate for a product or service
  • 92% of consumers trust brand advocates

Do brand advocates generate return on investment for brands? Here are 10 case studies that prove the ROI of brand advocates.

  • AMERICAN EXPRESS: To promote small business credit cards, American Express created a social media community for small business owners to share, learn and grow. They also created a holiday, Small Business Saturday. The community has 2,700,000+ Likes, 195,000 Tweets and American Express saw a +23% increase in transactions to small business merchants.
  • CARS.COM: encouraged rating, reviews and sharing (versus no ratings, reviews and sharing) and it showed that pages that had ratings and reviews had a 16% higher rate of conversion and a 100% higher rate of traffic through to dealer’s sites.
  • DUANE READE: A drugstore chain with 250 location in New York and New Jersey, used a VIP Blogger Team generating content via their own social platforms, DR-QR code landing page, blogs, and Google+, in addition to traditional PR tactics. The utilization of celebrity bloggers from daytime shows and one-hour Twitter parties created over 20 million impressions. From over 2000 pieces of original content, there was a 28% lift in year-over-year sales and a 5x ROI.
  • FOLICA: A well-known retailer of health and beauty products, noticed they had many referrals to their website, but had no way of tracking and identifying these referrals. By engaging their customers and encouraging them to share the secrets of great hair, customers were able to share via Facebook, Twitter, email and personalized urls. After 30 days of running the new Social Referral Program, 6,000 brand advocates were identified. The average number of shares per advocate was four. 21,000 shares had been generated via Facebook, Twitter and email and a 16% conversion rate was driven by the program.
  • J. HILBURN: A retail brand which was receiving many referrals from existing satisfied customers. By offering customers $50 for each friend referred and encouraging the advocates to share the offer using social media, brand advocates were identified and rewarded. Any referred customer who spent over $100 received a $50 discount on their purchase. After 45 days of running the new program, 1,000 customers had made referrals. Averaging 12 shares per advocate, the referral program produced 10,000 social shares via Facebook, Twitter and email. The bottom line result was 600 transactions which created over $250,000 in sales.
  • ROKU: specializes in streaming entertainment devices for television. With 1,000,000+ units already sold, they tapped their existing and large user database into a source of acquisition. Sales increased 30% and the number of monthly referrals is now around 10,000 per month.
  • SENDGRID, a cloud-based e-mail provider, contained a simple offer for existing customers which could be shared socially. The offer was made to existing customers to share referral links. This meant that when any of their referred friends became new paying customers of SendGrid, they would receive $20 cash and the referred customer would also receive a 25% discount on their first three months. SendGrid achieved a 111% ROI after six months of running thel program and a 353% ROI projected for the first year of the program.
  • STARBUCKS: Since 2008, MyStarbuckIdea.com has been advocate-driven idea tank where Starbucks drinkers submit ideas for new products and coffee concoctions. It has worked as a hub for all Starbucks customers to share all their ideas, suggestion and even their frustration.  “We used to launch a new product and it cost millions of dollars. Now, when we launch a new product, we already have millions of fans,” say Chris Bruzzo, Vice President Brand, Content and Online at Starbucks.
  • SUBWAY: Sponsored the “Slim Down Challenge,”  a live speaking event consisting of some of America’s hottest speakers and celebrities. Its mission was to travel from city to city across America delivering powerhouse information that challenged your mind, heart, and waistline. They used social technologies and promotion apps to raise awareness of the Slim Down Challenge and recruit speakers. The strategy included a social competition. This was part of a full marketing strategy for the campaign. They found that 71% of site traffic that went to the registration page, came directly from Facebook.
  • WALMART: Has 34,000.000+ fans, more than any other brand on any social platform. They also have more than 385,000 followers. They post 6 to 7 times per day. They engage with fans, regularly. Last year, on Black Friday, Walmart received 62,000 posts from consumers, a rate of 42 per minute. The engagement with consumers who spread the work is getting a “marketing equivalent” of 10X return-on-investment (ROI) compared to other advertising spends according to CMO, Stephen Quinn.

These case studies cover brands big and small, B2C and B2B and show brand advocates can be found for any business if you look for them. Do they convince you of the ROI of brand advocates?

To learn more about the ROI of social media marketing, download the ebook, 166 Case Studies Prove ROI of Social Media Marketing  (80,000+ people have). It’s free on the sidebar or join our email list and have case studies like these delivered to you.

Did these case studies on the ROI of brand advocates teach something new.

Brand Influencers vs. Brand Advocates

 

11 convincing case studies prove the ROI of CRM 0

Posted on November 03, 2013 by Rob Petersen

 

 

CRM

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a model for managing a company’s interactions with current and future customers. It involves technology and software to organize, automate and synchronize sales, marketing, customer service and technical support.

CRM has been with us since 1986 when ACT!, the #1 best-selling contact and customer manager, introduced the business world to contact management software, essentially a digital rolodex. Today, CRM involves the use cloud-based and SaaS CRM solutions to lower costs; the integration of marketing channels like digital social media and mobile devices to increase leads and conversion; and “Big Data” to make smarter business decision from analytics.

How is it working? Here are 11 convincing case studies to prove the ROI of CRM.

  • ALLINA HEALTH: Used CRM to manage its data warehouse. It’s identified benefits that include reduced patient length of stay, reduced admissions, and improved health outcomes in stroke, depression, and angioplasty treatments. Within 2 years, the CRM initiative had an ROI of +152% and generated $1,052,828 each year.
  • BEST BUY: Proactively monitored the social channels for customers in need of either customer service support or technical assistance. They created a CRM community to offer a place where  Best Buy’s advocates including Blueshirts, Geek Squad Agents, and the community teams used lTwitter as their customer service channel. There are now roughly 600,000 customers visiting the community and posting 20,000 messages (over 77,000 messages and counting). The community has published over 22 million pages of content. Best Buy estimates that online community engagements provide a benefit of over $5,000,000 to the organization.
  • BUSTED TEES: Sought to bring back recent customers and convert casual browsers, but they also wanted to re-engage with customers who hadn’t made a purchase, been to the website, or opened an email in a significant period of time. They use CRM Retargeting to serve display ads to people with nothing but an email or mailing address. It increased average order value to $40 and generated an ROI of +390%.
  • CANADA POST: One of the world’s largest and most technologically advanced postal companies, has $5.9 billion) in annual revenue. It uses CRM as a cornerstone of its business transformation, particularly with regards to electronic shipping tools for commercial customers; internet sales and service tools for customer self-service and easier access to services; and contact centers to give customer service agents integrated information for customer transactions. CRM saved $16.25 million in revenue leakage.
  • CISCO: Established a social media listening center. It listens to more than 5000 social mentions a day on Facebook, Twitter, and other social channels. Cisco has been able to control outside agency fees, avoid other customer and partner interaction costs, increase team productivity, and identify new sales opportunities. The social media listening center has had an ROI of +281% in 5 months to generates an annual benefits of $1,596,292.
  • GET SATISFACTION: A leading online customer community platform that companies use or customer support, idea submission, marketing and sales questions, and capturing positive feedback, focused traffic driving strategies on search, social media, blogging, and buildling a content community. The CRM strategy achieved an ROI of +104% in month one, +168% in month two and +248% in month three.
  • KIXEYE: An online gaming portal, used CRM to increase customer acquisition through its growing volume of Facebook ads. It’s enabled Kixeye to decrease annual advertising costs by 15%, extent the acquisition life cycle of games by 6 months and increased user productivity by 7.5 percent.
  • MAGOOSH GRE: offers online courses for GMAT, GRE and SAT courses including video explanations, subject lessons, and practice tests. Magoosh ran a test and found that people who had been retargeted converted at a significantly higher rate than the control group. A CRM retargeting campaign generating 1,123 conversions for an ROI of +486.
  • QOSINA: A medical and cosmetic components distributor, sells products to medical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, skincare and spa companies. It used Microsoft CRM to effectively track its customer and prospect interaction, and to provide management oversight for accountability of sales opportunities and salon industries. It generated ROI of +172% within 2 years.
  • TYROIT: is Europe’s largest manufacturer of bonded grinding, cutting-off, sawing, and drilling tools, generating $416 million in annual revenue from more than 70,000 unique products produced in 19 plants for 60 countries. Tyroit used CRM  integrate products and solutions to reduce the number of contact points and transaction costs. It increased bottom line costs by +25% and produced an ROI of +183% within 2 years.
  • ZENDESK: is a web-based customer support software company with a robust ticket management system and a strong customer community. They offer products from starting from a free trial to three paid tiers. They used retargeting to improve lead generation and saw conversion increase by +1317%.

As a full service digital marketing agency focused on proven relationship marketing principles and ROI,  we want to make sure there’s a case study that relevant to your biggest business challenge.

We pride ourselves on being, perhaps, the most robust resource for digital marketing case studies on the internet. Visit our Category Page on Case Studies; download our complementary eBook, 166 Case Studies Prove Social Media Marketing ROI; or sign up for our Newsletter to get the most current case studies, as soon as they are available.

Are case studies important to your business? Do these 11 case studies prove the ROI of CRM to you?

 

  • About

    BarnRaisers builds brands with proven relationship principles and ROI. We are a full service digital marketing agency. Our expertise is strategy, analytics and results.



↑ Top