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8 bad marketing automation practices to stop doing now 0

Posted on August 28, 2016 by Rob Petersen

marketing automation

  • 49% of companies use marketing automation.
  • 55% of B2B companies use it (emailmonday)

Marketing automation refers to software automating marketing actions. It’s used to automate repetitive tasks such as emails, social media, and other website actions. It’s a case where technology makes tasks easier.

But does easier make it better? Although the numbers say half of companies use marketing automation, do they use it well or badly?

How to tell? Here are 8 very bad marketing automation practices.

All of these, unfortunately, have happened to me. Have they happened do you?

1. LAUNCH RIGHT INTO THE HARD SELL: On the internet, it’s hard to make yourself approachable. How to do it is provide thoughtful content your audience values without asking for anything; rather, you explore common interests until your prospect is ready to buy. This is called social selling. Yes. It takes time. But it delivers a prospect who feels they know you and is more ready to take action. Here’s what not to do.

marketing automation

2. BRAG BEFORE KNOWING YOUR AUDIENCE: The best thing to do when sending a message to someone who doesn’t know you is show you understand them. The worst thing is brag about yourself. Here’s a good example of the latter.

ma_1-resized-600

 

3. BELIEVE CLEVERNESS COVERS UP YOU’RE A PEST: More is not better with marketing automation. If someone hasn’t taken any action, they’re either not interested or not ready. A very bad idea is bugging somebody like this:

marketing automation #3

4. USE GENERIC SUBJECT LINES: Your first chance, and probably only, to make a good impression is the subject line or headline of your content. Here is a sampling of subject lines from emails I’ve recently received: “It’s finally here,” “I want you back,” “As per my last email,” “After checking your services,” “Am I still welcome here?” All have been generated by marketing automation. Why would anyone open any of these?

5. SET IT AND FORGET IT: Although marketing automation makes tasks easier, it can also make tasks much less compassionate. This is especially true in social media. Below is an automated Tweet from the journal American Rifleman, which is associated with the National Rifle Association. It was pre-set to forget. But it went out as details surrounding the tragic shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, CO were being released. The respond below the NRA Tweet was not set to forget.

marketing automation #5

marketing automation - nra

6. NOT ENABLING SOMEONE TO UNSUBSCRIBE: The CAN-SPAM Act is a law that establishes requirement for commercial messages, gives recipients the right to have you stop emailing them, and spells out penalties for violations. The law states:  “Once people have told you they don’t want to receive more messages, you must honor a recipient’s opt-out request within 10 business days.”

7. TURN A DRIP CAMPAIGN INTO A DOWNPOUR:  A Drip Campaign s a method used in direct marketing to acquire customers through repetitive marketing actions. It involves sending marketing information to prospects repeatedly over longer periods of time in order to nurture prospects or leads. After once opening an email generated by marketing automation, I received the response below in less than an hour. Obviously, something I won’t do again.

marketing automation #7

 

8. DON’T BE A SORE LOSER: To anyone who uses these bad marketing automation practices, my guess is you are not seeing any success. If you’ve ever written an email like this, you’ve come to the point where you have to seriously evaluate your use of marketing automation.

marketing automation #8

Do these examples of bad marketing automation practices help which what you should and shouldn’t do? Have any of these every happened to you?

11 convincing case studies prove the ROI of CRM 0

Posted on November 03, 2013 by Rob Petersen

 

 

CRM

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a model for managing a company’s interactions with current and future customers. It involves technology and software to organize, automate and synchronize sales, marketing, customer service and technical support.

CRM has been with us since 1986 when ACT!, the #1 best-selling contact and customer manager, introduced the business world to contact management software, essentially a digital rolodex. Today, CRM involves the use cloud-based and SaaS CRM solutions to lower costs; the integration of marketing channels like digital social media and mobile devices to increase leads and conversion; and “Big Data” to make smarter business decision from analytics.

How is it working? Here are 11 convincing case studies to prove the ROI of CRM.

  • ALLINA HEALTH: Used CRM to manage its data warehouse. It’s identified benefits that include reduced patient length of stay, reduced admissions, and improved health outcomes in stroke, depression, and angioplasty treatments. Within 2 years, the CRM initiative had an ROI of +152% and generated $1,052,828 each year.
  • BEST BUY: Proactively monitored the social channels for customers in need of either customer service support or technical assistance. They created a CRM community to offer a place where  Best Buy’s advocates including Blueshirts, Geek Squad Agents, and the community teams used lTwitter as their customer service channel. There are now roughly 600,000 customers visiting the community and posting 20,000 messages (over 77,000 messages and counting). The community has published over 22 million pages of content. Best Buy estimates that online community engagements provide a benefit of over $5,000,000 to the organization.
  • BUSTED TEES: Sought to bring back recent customers and convert casual browsers, but they also wanted to re-engage with customers who hadn’t made a purchase, been to the website, or opened an email in a significant period of time. They use CRM Retargeting to serve display ads to people with nothing but an email or mailing address. It increased average order value to $40 and generated an ROI of +390%.
  • CANADA POST: One of the world’s largest and most technologically advanced postal companies, has $5.9 billion) in annual revenue. It uses CRM as a cornerstone of its business transformation, particularly with regards to electronic shipping tools for commercial customers; internet sales and service tools for customer self-service and easier access to services; and contact centers to give customer service agents integrated information for customer transactions. CRM saved $16.25 million in revenue leakage.
  • CISCO: Established a social media listening center. It listens to more than 5000 social mentions a day on Facebook, Twitter, and other social channels. Cisco has been able to control outside agency fees, avoid other customer and partner interaction costs, increase team productivity, and identify new sales opportunities. The social media listening center has had an ROI of +281% in 5 months to generates an annual benefits of $1,596,292.
  • GET SATISFACTION: A leading online customer community platform that companies use or customer support, idea submission, marketing and sales questions, and capturing positive feedback, focused traffic driving strategies on search, social media, blogging, and buildling a content community. The CRM strategy achieved an ROI of +104% in month one, +168% in month two and +248% in month three.
  • KIXEYE: An online gaming portal, used CRM to increase customer acquisition through its growing volume of Facebook ads. It’s enabled Kixeye to decrease annual advertising costs by 15%, extent the acquisition life cycle of games by 6 months and increased user productivity by 7.5 percent.
  • MAGOOSH GRE: offers online courses for GMAT, GRE and SAT courses including video explanations, subject lessons, and practice tests. Magoosh ran a test and found that people who had been retargeted converted at a significantly higher rate than the control group. A CRM retargeting campaign generating 1,123 conversions for an ROI of +486.
  • QOSINA: A medical and cosmetic components distributor, sells products to medical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, skincare and spa companies. It used Microsoft CRM to effectively track its customer and prospect interaction, and to provide management oversight for accountability of sales opportunities and salon industries. It generated ROI of +172% within 2 years.
  • TYROIT: is Europe’s largest manufacturer of bonded grinding, cutting-off, sawing, and drilling tools, generating $416 million in annual revenue from more than 70,000 unique products produced in 19 plants for 60 countries. Tyroit used CRM  integrate products and solutions to reduce the number of contact points and transaction costs. It increased bottom line costs by +25% and produced an ROI of +183% within 2 years.
  • ZENDESK: is a web-based customer support software company with a robust ticket management system and a strong customer community. They offer products from starting from a free trial to three paid tiers. They used retargeting to improve lead generation and saw conversion increase by +1317%.

As a full service digital marketing agency focused on proven relationship marketing principles and ROI,  we want to make sure there’s a case study that relevant to your biggest business challenge.

We pride ourselves on being, perhaps, the most robust resource for digital marketing case studies on the internet. Visit our Category Page on Case Studies; download our complementary eBook, 166 Case Studies Prove Social Media Marketing ROI; or sign up for our Newsletter to get the most current case studies, as soon as they are available.

Are case studies important to your business? Do these 11 case studies prove the ROI of CRM to you?

 

21 experts define CRM in their own words and pictures 9

Posted on June 09, 2012 by Rob Petersen

Peter Drucker“The purpose of a business is to create and keep a customer.”

This succinct truth from Peter Drucker in The Practice of Management (1954) is a apt and insightful definition of CRM (Customer Relationship Management).

But a lot has changed. CRM now involves technology, software, inbound and outbound marketing, lead acquisition, databases, multiple touch points, multi-channel marketing, enterprise solutions and social media.

Here’s how 21 expert define CRM.

  1. A way to identify, acquire, and retain customers, a business’ greatest asset. – Siebel
  2. A widely implemented model for managing a company’s interactions with customers, clients, and sales prospects. – Wikepedia
  3. An enterprisewide business strategy designed to optimize profitability, revenue and customer satisfaction by organizing the enterprise around customer segments, fostering customer-satisfying behaviors and linking processes from customers through suppliers – Gartner
  4. An application used to automate sales and marketing functions and to manage sales and service activities in an organization. – Microsoft
  5. A business strategy directed to understand, anticipate and respond to the needs of an enterprise’s current and potential customers in order to grow the relationship value. – CRM Forecast
  6. A strategy used to learn more about customers’ needs and behaviors in order to develop stronger relationships with them. – CIO
  7. An information industry term for methodologies, software, and usually Internet capabilities that help an enterprise manage customer relationships in an organized way. – Marios Alexandrou
  8. A comprehensive business model for increasing revenues and profits by focusing on customers. – Martin Walsh
  9. The belief that customers should feel like a VIP every time they communicate with your company. –  Jennifer Carnie, Customer Systems
  10. A management philosophy according to which a company’s goals can be best achieved through identification and satisfaction of the customers’ stated and unstated needs and wants. – Business Dictionary (1 of 2) 
  11. A computerized system for identifying, targeting, acquiring, and retaining the best mix of customers. – Business Dictionary (2 of 2)
  12. A business process of understanding, collecting and managing all of the information in a business environment relating to a customer. The goal of CRM is to more effectively communicate with customers and improve customer relationships over time. – James Wong, Avidian Technologies
  13. The processes, software, and systems that help an enterprise manage its relationships with prospects, customers, distribution channels, call centers, and suppliers. – Complete CRM Solution
  14. A person you have dealings with on a professional basis. A relationship as how you interact with someone, your view of them, their view of you and how this affects the way you deal with each other. Being in control of your customer relationships, defining them, steering them in the direction you decide. – Bluesoft
  15. A combination of software and a customized software process to help companies gain a competitive advantage in either sales, marketing or customer service. – MondoCRM
  16. The aggregation of customer-centric strategies which drive new functional activity not only for sales, marketing and service, but often back office functions such as accounting, production, and shipping which demand reengineered work processes for everyone affected which require technology support to implement. – Unknown

CRM involves steps and stages that are sometimes better visualized. So, here are some ways the process of CRM is defined pictorially.

Sales Funnel

Zoho

Brain Carrol B2BLeadRoundtable

Brian Carroll - B2B Lead Roundtable

SprinxCRM

SprinxCRM

Amigolog CRM Overview

Amigolog

CRM Wheel

Gembrio

All of these definitions prove to me technology can advance the management of the customer; but the relationship that keeps them is the understanding of their needs and values, which has less to do with technology and a lot more to do with how you engage with your customers.

What do these definition prove to you?

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    BarnRaisers builds brands with proven relationship principles and ROI. We are a full service digital marketing agency. Our expertise is strategy, search and data-driven results.



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